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Menino Arts Center

Menino Arts Center

Menino Arts Center

3D exhibitions

  • Menino Arts Center

    Quilts and Fibers-Challenging the Boundaries

    14 Nov 2022 – 16 Jan 2023

    The Menino Arts Center proudly announces A REAL AND VIRTUAL 3D GALLERY EXHIBIT BY 34 ARTISTS Jurors Samantha Fields and Christle Rawlins-Jackson Artists Reception at the MAC Friday. December 2. 7 – 9 pm Curated by Sasja Lucas and Mary Harman Online at http://www.hpaa-mac.org/exhibits 34 Artists: Agusta Agustsson Andrew Patrick Cain Ann Niederkorn and Carrie Zizza Ann Schunior and Metta Lyons Barbara Fritz-Elliott Beckett Brueggemann Betsy Disharoon Camille L DeMarco Catherine Caddigan Etta Rosen Gloretta Baynes Janet Kawada Jessica Burko Joan Siem Katherine McGuinness Laura Petrovich-Cheney Lesyslie Rackard Liz Gray Liz Hardy LMerchie Frazier Luna Tudor-Doonan Marcia Kimball Kennedy Mary Harman Napoleon Jones-Henderson Patricia Shinn Wojtowicz Rainey Tisdale Sarah Spencer Selina Narovlansky Susan Thompson Valerie Maser-Flanagan Virginia Holloway Yve Holtzcaw Menino Arts Center 26 Central Ave, Hyde Park, MA Gallery Hours: Wed, Th, and Fri, 10-2pm or by appointment

  • Menino Arts Center

    The Drawing Exhibition, A Visible Mark: Expressive-Realistic-Symbolic

    07 Feb 2022 – 03 Apr 2022

    At its most basic, drawing is a visible mark. But it is also physical energy, a symbol, an expression, an inner form, an exploration, a kind of hypnotism, a visualized thought. Juror:Scott Bakal http://www.scottbakal.com Artists: Adam Campbell Albert Wallstrom Alla Lazebnik Ann Turley Barbara Adele Fritz-Elliott Erica Nazzaro Gabriel Polonsky Gail Bos Ginny Zanger Jan Shapiro Judith Brassard Brown Julia Cangiano Liz Hardy Lyasya Sinkovski Maritza Ranero Mark Younkle Mary Harman Mary McCusker Mary Russell Peggie Bouvier Rob Larsen Robert Boyle Robert Siegelman Sasja Lucas Sharon Berke Terry Boutelle Virginia Holloway

  • Menino Arts Center

    Infinite Dimensions

    02 Apr 2021 – 28 May 2021

    Infinite Dimensions: Theoretical, Physical, Imaginary. Possible or Impossible? Juried by Chris Fitch, a sculptor, engineer and inventor www.chrisfitchdesign.com Curated by Sasja Lucas www.sasjalucas.com The exhibition features 36 pieces from 21 artists. Adele Rothman Ann Turley Bradley Litwin Erik Gehring Gabriel Polonsky Ginny Zanger Jan Shapiro Joni Lohr Kiah Friedman Kyle Collins Linda Eyster Lisa Faye Goren Liz Hardy Lyasya Sinkovski Maria Luongo Nancy Marks Phyllis Bluhm Richard Youngstrom Rosemarie Michmerhuizen Sara Gately Suzette Lebenzon

  • Menino Arts Center

    Contemporary Quilts-Modern and Improvisational

    25 Oct 2021 – 23 Dec 2021

    Contemporary Quilts, Modern and Improvisational. Jurors: Susan Thompson, www.theartofsusanthompson.com and Napolean Jones-Henderson, www.napoleonjoneshenderson.com “Contemporary”: off-the-grid, off-center, minimalist, asymmetrical, high contrast, negative space focus, free-motion style. (No traditional fixed pattern) This exhibition features 42 quilts made by 28 quilters from 19 neighborhoods and towns surrounding Boston. It features quilts as large as 96" x 72", and as small as 9" x 11". We hope you enjoy the wide variety of work you see represented here. WHY WE QUILT Quilting reflects a choice to work in a medium that is counterculturally and lusciously slow. It can be practiced as a communal activity and single quilts can involve the work of one to many quilters. Improv quilting calls upon the quilter to start with a few fabrics and an idea or two about shapes to work with, and then to work intuitively, not following a preconceived idea about how the finished quilt will look. The final image is achieved through the physical interaction with fabric in a process that is meditative, engaging, and centering. Improv quilting allows for individual expression that is less encumbered by art world expectations. It embraces materials ranging from new to upcycled, used fabrics, and anything that can be sewn, glued, or otherwise attached to the quilt surface. The rich tradition of quilting, still predominantly, though not exclusively, practiced by women, produces quilts that are warm, soft, and bring comfort and quilts that embody powerful social commentary. Curated by Sasja Lucas, www.sasjalucas.com Co-Curator, Mary Harman, Instagram at @maryharma Artists: Adrienne Sloane Barbara Adele Fritz-Elliott Beverly Arsem Chris Fitch and Lils Romero Christle Rawlins-Jackson Cynthia Laing Erica S Nazzaro Gail Pettiford Willett Judith Lebow Lesyslie Rackard Liz Gray Liz Hardy L’Merchie Frazier Marge Tucker Mary Harman Mary McCusker and Phyllis Bluhm and Mary Harman and Terry Boutelle Nancy Crasco Pat McSweeney Patricia Shinn Wojtowicz Susan Strouse Tamara Safford Tricia Deck Valerie Maser-Flanagan Virginia Holloway Wit Lopez

  • Menino Arts Center

    Curry College: Student, Alumni, And Faculty

    18 Apr 2022 – 15 May 2022

    Juried, curated, and displayed both physically and virtually in a 3D gallery www.hpaa-mac.org/exhibits STUDENT ARTISTS Anthony Aiken Alexandria Campbell William hagar Kava Hanuschok Sydney Imprescio _Samanth _Incha Kirchmvpr channa Lauder Alan Liang Abigail Leonard Kyle MacDonald Eduardo Marquez neIsey Mordles Ariana Jade Odwara Abadan sanchez Valerie Sarakinioks Jenna Shelley Eleanor Udaven Hannah Zall ALUMNI ARTISTS Daniel Roupr Anthony Creary Dominique roouy -Yaola Goldblat Elizabeth Guerro Nicolette Mover Stephanie Scanion Max Stone FACULTY ARTISTS Laurie Alpert Elfam burk Iris kumar Julie Martini Bruce Wahl Menino Arts Center Curator: Sasja Lucas

  • Menino Arts Center

    Shared Habitat Earth

    26 May 2022 – 30 Jun 2022

    Shared Habitat Earth Exhibition Curated by Barbara Eskin and Sasja Lucas May 25 - June 30, 2022 In Person Reception at the MAC: Thursday, May 26, 7 - 830 pm The exhibition features the work of 23 SHE artists representing cross species respect, intercultural solidarity, and a shared sense of responsibility; and 6 youth artists with Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Programs, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit that has engaged nearly 25,000 students worldwide to use art to advocate for the environment. The exhibition will be presented both physically at the MAC and virtually in a 3D gallery you can stroll through at http://www.hpaa-mac.org/exhibits/. Artists: Sharon Whitham June August Jennifer Jean Okumura Susan H Leskin Lisa Goren Kirstin Ilse Becky Gibbs Helen Canetta Barbara Fletcher Lisa Reindorf Bette Ann Libby Marianne A. Kinzers Laurie McGowan Yvonne Lamothe Barbara Eskin Agusta Agustsson Ruth Ginsberg-Place Gillian Frazier Niamh Ultaigh Nora Charney Rosenbaum James C Varnum Marjorie Kaye Phyllis Ewen Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Student Artists: Chloe Lou Ishanvi Kommula Ava Park Roy Kim Orion Yang Ayla Ikezawa

  • Menino Arts Center

    33rd Annual Members Exhibit, Hyde Park Art Association

    13 Jul 2022 – 18 Sep 2022

    The Menino Arts Center. 26 Central Ave. Hyde Park. MA a Real and 3D virtual gallery exhibition hpaa-mac.org/exhibits works by 56 members Awards juried by Melissa Meyer, Sarah Rodrigo, and Amber Torres of the City of Boston’s Arts and Culture Department Exhibition curated by Sasja Lucas Other Media: Gail Bos Catherine Caddigan Kevin Faherty Barbara Fritz-Elliot Liz Hardy Mary Harman Mary Hogan Carol Johnson Robert Johnson Angela Kelly Rob Larsen Sasja Lucas Pat McSweeney Erica Nazzaro Mardi Reed Tamara Safford Martha Starr Janice Williams Painting: Susan Allen Dotti Baker Sharon Berke Phyllis Bluhm Terry Boutelle Daniel Boyer Robert Boyle David Dauer Suzanne Hoffman Larry Johnson Jamie Kendrioski Barbara Kibler Harikleia Kuliopulos Oscar Lazo Gabriel Polonsky Maritza Ranero Judith Robichaud Mary Russell Jan Shapiro Lyasya Sinkovski Susan Strouse Donna Tessari Ann Turley Albert Wallstrom Glenn Williams Ginny Zanger Photography: Dimitrios Bakolas Myrna Balk Linde Eyster Erik Gehring Virginia Holloway Joni Lohr Rob MacIntosh Kay Matthew Kathy O’Brien Kaye Richardson Adele Rothman Mark Wise

  • Menino Arts Center

    Violence Transformed-Unquiet Voices

    03 Oct 2022 – 06 Nov 2022

    Violence Transformed, Unquiet Voices (Invitational) Menino Arts Center, 26 Central Ave, Hyde Park, MA October 3 – November 6 When the art reveals the ignored and is about troubling times. The image exposes problems The truth bursts into color on canvas and into 3D When the art celebrates affirmations, resilience and quiet. Our voices join to find solutions and our hope for the future endures. Artists Opening Reception: Friday, Oct 14, 7-8:30pm, Artist's Talk, Shea Justice Menino Arts Center Artists Closing Reception: Sunday, November 6, 3-5pm Menino Arts Center. Longwood Symphony Orchestra trio or solo TAP (Transformative Action Project) Interventions Workshops Free-of-charge trauma-informed interventions to groups of people who have suffered from or been witnesses to violence and the risk of violence, racial, ethnic or gender bigotry, child abuse, sexual abuse, etc and/or who have worked with victims of such abuse and thus may be victims of vicarious or secondary trauma. TAP Workshop: Thursday, Oct 20, 6:30-8pm L'Merchie, TAP Director of Creative Engagement TAP Workshop: Wed, Nov 2, 6-7:30pm Barbara Hamm, Co-Director of TAP Info: www.tap.violencetransformed.org Info: www.violencetransformed.com Info: African American Masters in Residency Program at North Eastern University: AAMARP Artists: Susan Thompson Hakim Raquib Reginald Jackson Khalid Kodi Brian McFarlane Don West Gloretta Baynes Ricardo Gomez L’Merchie Frazier Jeff Chandler Shea Justice Kofi Kayiga Pamella Goncalves Myrna Balk Marnie Sinclair Terry Boutelle Mary Russell Sasja Lucas Gail Bos Ruth Rosner Nancy Marks Mary McCusker Curators: Gail Bos, Ruth Rosner, Gloretta Baynes MAC Curator: Sasja Lucas www.sasjalucas.com

  • Menino Arts Center

    Ellen C. Gower, A Retrospective: ab ovo usque ad mala (from eggs to apples)

    30 Jan 2023 – 06 Mar 2023

    This exhibition is lovingly dedicated to the memory of Ellen by Ellen's sister, Holly Boots and friends Ann Turley, Maria Luongo, Jane Estella, Tamara Safford, and Sasja Lucas. Curated by Holly Boots, Sasja Lucas,Ann Turley, Maria Luongo, Jane Estella, Tamara Safford. MAC Curator, Sasja Lucas The title of this exhibition and catalogue, ab ovo usque ad mala (from eggs to apples), was once used by the artist, Ellen C. Gower, to describe a series of still life photographs she exhibited in 2005 and 2006. She explained at the time that “[t]he epigram refers to the Roman banquet (for us it would be soup to nuts), but it has acquired the connotations of from beginning to end, birth to death and alpha to omega. Eggs to apples runs the gamut of the human lifespan.” In light of this understanding, it was deemed an appropriate title for the present catalogue as well, which provides a retrospective window into Ellen’s artistic output over many decades, from oil paintings during her teenage years in the late 1950’s to pen and ink drawings during the years before her death in 2021. Artistic expression was always an important part of Ellen’s life, although she initially pursued a career in science. She was educated at Swarthmore College and earned a PhD in neuroscience from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For many years thereafter she conducted and published research on cognition and memory while affiliated with the Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, and Tufts University. But her youthful passion for art never waned, and she continued to engage in drawing and painting for pleasure. After she moved on from her scientific career, she studied at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and The School of the Museum of Fine Arts. She then turned back with renewed energy to drawing, painting, and photography, especially of the natural world, and exhibited her work through many local arts organizations. In describing how she approached her art, Ellen once stated that, because of her background as a neuroscientist who had long been interested in how the brain, mind, memory and cognition work, her concern in art, as in science, had been with “exploring where meaning originates and memory resides, using multiple media to produce images that would encourage the viewer to create their own projections.” She explained, “[i]t is quite likely that the meanings manifested are completely different for every viewer. Or maybe they are not. After all, we share a large and complex suite of inner forces, intentions, joys, fears and delusions that we refer externally, including into the very pictures before us, as we build a world around ourselves in which we find ourselves at home. Therefore, I like to encourage you, the viewer, to enrich the images you see here by finding your own resonances in them, and to think they very well might have been mine too. Either way, we have communicated.” In keeping with this concept, Ellen’s first one-woman public showing of her paintings and prints in 2003 was entitled, “The dialogue of perception and reality: You gotta change your mind.” A local newspaper article discussing the exhibition noted that “[w]hether or not [she] is conscious [of] the seeming paradox, she does give a scientific flavor to much of her work. Many of her acrylic-on-paper paintings feature layered, dribbled shapes that resemble slides of brain cells from ninth grade biology. These shapes sit atop one another in shades of red, brown, blue and black - looking chaotic but suggesting order.” In contrast, “[h]er photo work is the opposite: ordered but suggesting chaos. [S]he shoots extreme close-ups of grass, water, and dew on leaves. The subjects are familiar, but the level of magnification makes the natural look nether-worldly.” Ellen elaborated that [i]t’s the chaotic element which, I think, is important in allowing other people to find their own thing in the work. . . . It’s interesting to hear people’s commentary and see how their thoughts add to what they see.” Ellen’s early paintings were mostly oil on canvas depictions of scenes in and around the town of Rockport, Massachusetts, where she spent a summer during her high school years and won a prize at the town’s summer art show. She subsequently discontinued oil painting and experimented with abstract watercolor paintings consisting of thin bands in pastel hues floating on canvas and with fast drying acrylics, which, she stated, “helps drive away the desire for perfection.” Her figure drawings rendered many years later in flamboyant lines and colors and her pastel portraits, which tend to focus on character rather than photographic detail, likewise reflect her desire to avoid constraints and stimulate the viewer’s imagination. Her more recent interest in photography, particularly of the natural world, was perhaps most influenced by her scientific research and microscopic examination of the brain. She explained that “[neurology] has a perceptual process that is artistic in nature, especially when you get in really close, you get down into the tissue.” This is seen most clearly in her extreme close-ups of plant life that feature unique detail and color. In summing up her approach, she said: “I want to leave the real world behind to show how our perceptions of familiar things can disappear under certain circumstances. . . . Then you’re free to see what you want.” This was also the reason she deliberately gave ambiguous titles, or no titles at all, to many of her photographs, including cityscapes, landscapes, and still lifes such as “. . . a tangled web,” “the moon is reflected in every drop,” “means of apprehension: edge” and “intimacy.” She wrote, “I supply some titles” but, as previously noted, she wanted to encourage the viewer to enrich the images by “finding [their] own resonances in them . . . .” Ellen came to learn in a very direct way almost ten years later that this hope had been fulfilled. A high school poetry teacher in a nearby town who had brought her class to visit a local art museum exhibition asked her students to create a poem for something they had seen that intrigued them. One student selected a still life photograph by Ellen, titled “degrees of separation,” and the teacher sent her a copy of his response. In the introduction to his poem, the student wrote: "Compositions tend to have a secret meaning, or hide a message in their art that the viewers are able to grasp or understand. . . . [“degrees of separation”] was . . . an image that appeared to be an abstract painting but was actually the image of an egg next to its holder. This imagery reached me because of its secrecy and confidentiality. I was compelled to write a poem about this piece because I feel the poem was meant to be a metaphor [for] one’s life - someone who lives in secrecy himself. I felt that pain of [living] in secret, and that was my drive to write a poem for this piece.” In taking a close-up photograph of two familiar objects, an egg and its holder, from a unique perspective and giving it an ambiguous title, Ellen implicitly encouraged the viewer in this case to use his own life experience and perceptions of reality to inform his understanding of the image, just as she had wished. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue that includes more images than are exhibited here. Credits: Design, Leslie Ann Feagley Photographer, Erik Gehring Curators, Holly Gower Boots, Sasja Lucas

  • Menino Arts Center

    In Flux, An exhibition of MEGA Prints and Drawings by Sasja Lucas

    15 Oct 2021 – 04 Dec 2021

    Works on paper ranging in size up to 72" x 52" Prints on paper ranging in size up to 72" x 40"

  • Menino Arts Center

    A Sense of Place : Rosemarie Michmerhuizen

    01 Mar 2021 – 26 Apr 2021

    A Retrospective of Collages "My media is collage. My work is a journey from reality to fantasy: I disassemble and reassemble images. The most important activity in collage-making is seeing. Believing what you see and knowing it is real. I do not attach hidden meanings or stories to these pieces. Each work arises from mutual attraction among several images. I free those from their context or their original surroundings, so that they can become acquainted with each other in the final construction." For inquiries about the purchase of a work, click on the envelope icon, bottom right of each image and submit a message. Curated by www.sasjalucas.com

    exhibiting artists

    latest works

    • Ellen Gower

      untitled pen and ink figures
      20 x 30 inch (h x w)
      pen and ink
    • Ellen Gower

      nature
      16 x 20 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      nature
      16 x 20 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      nature
      16 x 20 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Byron C. Gower

      untitled
      19.5 x 13 inch (h x w)
    • Ellen Gower

      in Thebes
      20 x 14 inch (h x w)
      conte crayon on paper
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled portrait V
      18 x 14 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on paper
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled portrait IV
      18 x 14 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on paper
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled portrait III
      18 x 14 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on paper
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled portrait II
      18 x 14 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on paper
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled portrait I
      18 x 14 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on paper
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled wavescape III
      18 x 24 inch (h x w)
      watercolor on canvas
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled wavescape II
      8.5 x 23.5 cm (h x w)
      watercolor on canvas
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled wavescape I
      18 x 24 inch (h x w)
      watercolor on canvas
    • Ellen Gower

      gyres and Jewels V
      7.5 x 7.5 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      gyres and jewels II
      7 x 9.5 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled eggs to apples
      12 x 18 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      untitled from eggs to apples
      12 x 12 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      intimacy
      7.5 x 7.5 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print
    • Ellen Gower

      degrees of separation
      25 x 19 inch (h x w)
      archival inkjet print