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John Quatrale

Unbound Visual Arts

Unbound Visual Arts

Unbound Visual Arts

Unbound Visual Arts (UVA), a 501(c)(3) non-profit, is governed by a 17-person Board of Directors and Council of Advisors, enriches its communities with educational and inspiring exhibitions and programs for cultural enhancement. UVA’s independently curated exhibitions are meaningful yet still provide a strong learning environment as well as providing opportunities for the local artists. The exhibitions may promote passion, purpose, issues, ideas and solutions, social change and justice, and memories.


A major part of Unbound Visual Arts’ mission is to present curated educational art exhibitions on important cultural and social topics, such as wellness, non-violence, gender equality, and environmental sustainability. That mission is a unique means of presenting contemporary art exhibitions.


320 Waahington Street, Suite 200,

3D exhibitions

  • Unbound Visual Arts

    Stronger Sisterhood: Representing Intersectional Identity, curated by Paige Moreau

    29 Jan 2021 – 31 Mar 2021

    NOTE: The catalogue to the left includes all of the art. To view the all artist statements and biographies visit https://www.unboundvisualarts.org/stronger-sisterhood-catalogue Stronger Sisterhood: Representing Intersectional Identity “As long as women are using class or race power to dominate other women, feminist sisterhood cannot be fully realized” -bell hooks "Stronger Sisterhood: Representing Intersectional Identity," is a virtual exhibition in a virtual gallery that explores the multidimensional and intersectional identities of women. The history of feminism has often been described in “waves”. The first wave is defined by the fight for women’s suffrage from the late 19th to early 20th century. The second wave, in the mid 20th century, focused on gender equality in the workplace, the home, and in civil liberties. Both of these movements, while making great strides for women, failed to address deeper compounded layers of oppression and marginalization faced by many women. First and second wave feminism were largely white middle class women’s movements and were often exclusionary of women of color, the LGBTQ+ community, working class women, women with disabilities and so on. The movements kept a narrow scope by focusing on a one dimensional vision of what it means to be a woman assuming common experiences and levels of marginalization based on gender identity. In reality, oppressions experienced by way of gender do not exist in a vacuum but instead intersect with multiple facets of identity. In 1989, lawyer, civil rights activist, and critical race theorist, Kimberlė Crenshaw coined the term “intersectionality” to describe how gender, race, class, and other individual characteristics intersect and augment oppressions. At present, the recognition of intersectionality’s importance in women’s rights has grown into a third wave of feminism that strives to recognize all the forms of oppression that female identifying people face. Art created by a diverse range of female identifying artists is a key into visualizing and representing intersectional experiences. “Stronger Sisterhood: Representing Intersectional Identity” showcases that women’s experiences are not one but many, and only through diversity in representation can we begin to grasp a three dimensional view of all women. How do our experiences as women differ due to other facets of our identity? How are we made stronger by recognizing and honoring these differences? How has the recognition of intersectional feminism grown and where is there more work to be done? The 1st and 2nd Wave: The Fundamentals The metaphor of the wave when thinking about the history of feminism has its pitfalls. It can be reductive, instigate intergenerational disagreement and even suggest that women's rights fall in and out of fashion. However, as a historical construct, it has shaped the way we think about the timeline of women's rights and had a deep cultural impact that shows through even into contemporary art. This first grouping of artwork taps into ideas that have been stereotypically considered pertinent to first and second wave feminism. While first and second wave feminism are largely considered unique movements at separate moments in history their basic principles of recognizing inequalities between the sexes and fighting for that equality create a link. The 3rd Wave: A Tide Shift Where first and second wave feminism can be nudged into neat time frames third wave feminism is harder to pin to a confined set of dates. However, a sizable shift occurred in the early 1990s originating from thinkers, such as Kimberlé Crenshaw and Judith Butler, that redirected focus under the large umbrella of feminism toward women's intersectional identities. Crenshaw described how different forms of oppression intersect and Butler argued that gender and sex exist separate from one another and that gender is not innate but a learned set of performative characteristics. These strides in our understanding of identity changed the "tide" of feminism to be more inclusive and consider how race, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability status and inform oppression and change the fight for equality. Today: Women in 2020 2020 was a collective year of reckoning politically, socially and economically and women were often disproportionately impacted, losing more jobs than men, facing heightened inequality at home through unpaid care, and making up 77% of the healthcare workforce. Although women have faced the worst of the pandemic, racial injustices, and income inequality and they have manage to affect enormous change in the past year. Tremendous strides have been made by women, especially women of color, in the form of championing the Black Lives Matter movement, registering record numbers of black voters in Georgia, and rising to the Vice Presidency of the United States. Artists turned to their crafts to make sense of the tumultuous year. Here, artists chose to explore what it means to be a woman in a global pandemic, how a woman's right to choose is still being called into question and how tapping into an over-the-top femininity can be both comforting and empowering. --Paige Moreau, Exhibition Curator

  • Unbound Visual Arts

    A Light I Knew Well- Karlena Fletcher

    19 Jan 2021 – 31 Mar 2021

    "I dedicate this exhibition to my late ‘Granny Tia,’ who carried a fondness for sentiment that to this day remains unmatched. Losing her instilled in me a longing to preserve what is beautiful, only to later realize that life gives beauty in mundane places and grants meaning in the subtlest ways. This exhibition is the culmination of two years of closely observing my surroundings in hopes of capturing patterns of light I encounter in my present or remember vividly from my past. Each work of art operates as a visual poem that narrates this act of appreciating and preserving my many homes." Karlena Fletcher is a current BFA candidate at Boston University and has recently completed an internship with Unbound Visual Arts. Born in Little Rock, Arkansas and raised all over the world, Karlena considers her experiences in other cultures and countries to be a critical influence in her artistic practice. *For an optimal viewing experience, we recommend clicking "Enter Exhibition" and navigating the gallery clockwise beginning at the statement, rather than selecting "start guided tour." Thank you.*

  • Unbound Visual Arts

    Momentary Spaces

    03 Sep 2020 – 30 Oct 2020

    Momentary Spaces Organized & presented by Unbound Visual Art in UVA's Virtual Gallery Opening September 3 - October 30, 2020 An exhibit featuring the artwork of four 2020 Summer volunteers with Unbound Visual Arts. Artists:  Sofija Chroneos, Rachel Hargreaves, Julia Marcantonio, Cynthia Bryndis Schilling    Exhibition Coordinators: John Quatrale and Sequoya Molzan Sofija Chroneos is an MA candidate in Art Education at the Boston University College of Fine Arts, and completed a BFA in Sculpture from BU. “Layering reused materials through space has been the focus of my work. I am continually searching for materials, whether found or re-purposed, to use with limited regard to their utilitarian value. This process disrupts their origin but establishes a new place they can exist. At the same time, I do not disguise their physical qualities: a box remains a box; a piece of cloth remains a piece of cloth.” Rachel Hargreaves studied art and education at American University and now teaches at a DC Public middle school. “Walk among the classical, architectural giants of a city while gazing at the graffiti lining the street. How do we classify the new art of the people and the designs of the old institution? Read through the everyday terrors as your eye fixes on the bold headlines. But do you see the colors and faces hidden in the photograph? All of these works grapple with questions of aesthetic and art’s place in politics, architecture, and tragedy.” Julia Marcantonio is a rising senior at Brown University in Providence, majoring in Modern Culture and Media. “The digital photographs shown in this exhibition were taken while I was studying in Greece. Working in both color and black and white, I am interested in experimenting with texture, flatness/depth, and attention to negative space. I am drawn to puzzling images and enjoy taking an instinctive and unplanned approach to capturing photographs.” Cynthia Bryndis Schilling is an MFA candidate in graphic design at UMass Dartmouth, and holds a BM in piano performance from UMass Amherst. “As a pianist and artist, I am inspired by music’s aesthetic and structural qualities. Music is imbued with stunningly beautiful emotion and expressivity, and I aim to capture that through color, form, depth, texture, and abstraction in my art and design work.”

  • Unbound Visual Arts

    Portraits in Refuge

    22 Jul 2020 – 30 Oct 2020

    Portraits in Refuge Presented and organized by Unbound Visual Arts Curator: Karen Smigliani Exhibition Coordinator:: John Quatrale Exhibition Assistance: Sofija Chroneos, Rachel Hargraves, Julia Marcantonio, Sequoya Molzan, Cynthia Bryndis Schilling Fifteen artists share expressions of isolation, anxiety, peace, beauty and optimism during our pandemic. Please consider donation to or a membership with Unbound Visual Arts https://www.unboundvisualarts.org/get-involved/ You can also consider purchasing a work of art: https://www.unboundvisualarts.org/product-category/portraits-in-refuge-virtual-exhibition/ Here is a sampling of statements from the artists: Nancer Ballard: Most of all, this time has reaffirmed my conviction that there is no room for “othering” in “us;” we are all in this together. Anita Helen Cohen: Even though [my] paintings represent 'shelter and calm', there is also movement and chaos in the water. April Jakubec: [My] portraits with hidden eyes take on extra meaning during this time of isolation and fighting for equality, representing feelings of being “unseen”. Madeline Lee: With the inability to go many places aside from where I live, I've found myself paying more attention to the spaces I inhabit, noticing my surroundings. Niki Li: By immersing myself in art making and contemplation, I managed to find the light and power within myself. Cesar Rodrigues: [My] paintings may seem chaotic at first glance, like the times we are in, but when you really sit back and look you begin to see the beauty.

  • Unbound Visual Arts

    New Narratives: Reclaiming Asian Identity Through Story

    24 Jul 2020 – 30 Oct 2020

    New Narratives: Reclaiming Asian Identity Through Story Organized and presented by Unbound Visual Arts Curator: Leslie Anne Condon Please consider donation to or a membership with Unbound Visual Arts https://www.unboundvisualarts.org/get-involved/ You can also consider purchasing a work of art: https://www.unboundvisualarts.org/product-category/new-narratives-reclaiming-asian-identity-through-story/ How we define the terms "Asian" and "Asian American" in the United States is often driven by our visual and popular culture. Over the span of only a few generations, the meaning of these terms has continued to evolve, heavily influenced by changing immigration patterns, academic scholarship, the National Census Bureau, and domestic policy. The unique histories of our respective ancestral lands (East, South, and Southeast Asia), shaped by war, Imperialism, Colonialism, and more recent tensions, further complicate the concept of identity within our communities. Many of us, our parents, and our grandparents, came to the States seeking new opportunities, only to face racism, xenophobia, anti-Asian rhetoric, and discriminatory legal practices. While much progress has been made in recent decades to overcome such notions as the Model Minority Myth, we continue to push for more authentic, comprehensive, and nuanced representation within all facets of American society. Through this reclamation, we actively empower ourselves and reinforce our sense of agency within the greater community. New Narratives: Reclaiming Asian Identity Through Story features forty artworks by twenty-five Boston-area Asian artists who are exploring aspects of their identity through their art, as well as Asian culture and narrative informed by personal experience. Whether the work is referencing the self and body, sexuality and gender, or intergenerational conflict and healing within the Asian community, each artist brings their distinctive perspective to the exhibition through unexpected visuals and contemporary techniques. Collectively, the exhibition offers a partial glimpse rather than a sweeping overview of the many complex issues that Asians and Asian Americans navigate daily as part of our lived realities. It also reflects, in some part, the complex and evergrowing iterations of Asian identity that continue to emerge from every corner of the Greater Boston area. These creative gestures are at once expressions of pain and resiliency, resistance, and celebration. -- Leslie Anne Condon, Curator Partnering Organizations: Asian Glow Boston, Asian American Resource Workshop, Dorchester Art Project, Pao Arts Center, Network for Arts Administrators of Color, Subcontinental Drift Boston Exhibition Coordinator: John Quatrale Exhibition Assistance: Sofija Chroneos, Rachel Hargreaves, Julia Marcantonio, Sequoya Molzan, Cynthia Bryndis Schilling

    latest works

    • Amaranthia Sepia

      (Video) Art & Mind: Reflections of Women, Femmes and Our Mental Health During COVID, 2021
      Video
    • Mary B. Vannucci

      Be Bop Men
      24 x 30 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Acrylic on canvas
    • Lydia Lodynsky

      Ofrenda Evolution (new video)
    • Lydia Lodynsky

      "From Grief to Redemption"
      72 x 48 inch (h x w)
      wood, dried and silk flowers, photographic images, individual art pieces and miscellaneous personal effects
    • Linda Clave

      Open the Door of the Sun
      30 x 30 inch (h x w)
      USD 1200
    • Steph Koufman

      Untitled
      18 x 24 x 1.3 inch (h x w x d)
      USD 500
    • Steph Koufman

      Stepping Out
      36 x 24 x 1.3 inch (h x w x d)
      oil and acrylic paint
      USD 750
    • Steph Koufman

      Home
      22 x 26 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
      Oil paint, joint compound
      USD 500
    • Sam Fein

      Out of Reach
      15.8 x 23.8 x 3 inch (h x w x d)
      Paint, glitter, candy, prescription bottles, and mixed media on medicine cabinet
      USD 1650
    • Sam Fein

      Labrynth
      20.3 x 20.3 inch (h x w)
      Gouache, Pencil, and other mixed media
      USD 1650
    • Romani Berkekov

      Into the Vortex
      30 x 48 x 1.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Acrylic on canvas
      USD 1600
    • Pauline Lim

      The Show Is Over
      36 x 48 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
      Acrylic on canvas
      USD 3500
    • Pauline Lim

      Live in a Balance of Hope and Fear
      23.8 x 27 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
      acrylic on wood
      USD 3000
    • Pauline Lim

      Bereaved Dog
      24 x 20 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
      Oil on Canvas Panel
      USD 520
    • Maia Monteagudo

      Compertmentalize
      20 x 16 inch (h x w)
      Acrylic paint, Collage, pen on black canvas
    • Maia Monteagudo

      Broken
      10 x 8 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Digital print
      USD 40
    • Jennifer Turpin

      Open Circuit
      60 x 20 x 20 inch (h x w x d)
      3D Sculpture
      USD 450
    • Amaranthia Sepia

      Hidden Demons of Anxiety, Mask 4 Falling Prey
      14 x 11 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Ink pen, Digital Coloring
    • Amaranthia Sepia

      Hidden Demons of Anxiety- Mask 2 Distraught
      14 x 11 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Ink pen, Digital Coloring
    • Amaranthia Sepia

      Hidden Demons of Anxiety- Mask 1 Dissociation,
      14 x 11 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)