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stephen ROMANO gallery

Stephen Romano

Stephen Romano

Stephen Romano

Stephen Romano Gallery has collaborated with cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Reina Sophia in Madrid, Gagosian Gallery in New York, the Dark Mofo Festival in Tasmania, Morbid Anatomy at Greenwood Cemetery, The American Folk Art Museum in New York, the Buckland Museum of Witchcraft and Magick in Cleveland, among others. We further support our beloved artist community by producing pop up exhibitions, the most recent of which was a Twin Peaks tribute show "No Stars" in collaboration wth Josh Stebbins and Rebekah Del Rio.


We continue to seek new and innovative ways to be a presenter by perpetuating the art of the esoteric. We may be contacted at romanostephen@gmail.com .


266 East 5th Street
2nd floor

3D exhibitions

  • Stephen Romano

    Wolfgang Grasse 1930 - 2008

    Wolfgang Grasse 1930 - 2008

  • Stephen Romano

    William Mortensen's WITCHES

    William Mortensen's WITCHES

  • Stephen Romano

    RAY ROBINSON "The Third Door"

    "..and so pass through the matrix of memory and through The archetype that defined the first vision and set our Parameters To an inner meaning without external references, THE THIRD DOOR The Art of Ray Robinson by Charlotte Rodgers Witches? Poor Devils Each of the paintings has a true circumstance…and the result of my ‘being there’ My general observation of my contribution was, as I wrote at the time ‘When reason sleeps in the minds of the wise Witches burn and demons rise’ THE ART OF RAY ROBINSON: THE THIRD DOOR by Charlotte Rodgers, October 6 2016 ‘NO ONE CAN MAKE A JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY BOWL..THEY GROW FROM THE HANDS OF THE MASTER AND THE NEEDS OF THE CLAY…THE MASTER ALLOW" Ray Robinson History is littered with visionaries who change our perception, Often, in these people’s lifetime their work, their art is only glimpsed out of the corner of an eye and whilst it changes you, the change isn’t necessarily acknowledged at source. It usually takes another visionary to stop, pause and recognise the impact. Rarely is the originator of the change of awareness still alive at this moment of recognition. I often wondered what it would be like to communicate with one of these iconoclasts. If I met Austin Osman Spare for instance, would I have the ability to recognise him, to pause, and open myself up to a different way of seeing? I first encountered Ray Robinson’s work when I was interviewing Gallery Owner and Art Dealer Stephen Romano, and I found it to be some of the most powerful art I’ve come across. Stephen suggested I contact Ray, and thus started one of the most magical mystery tours of an interview I’ve ever done. Now I’ve interviewed many artists and spiritual teachers, but this particular conversation fell into neither camp and was in a league apart from both. A good interviewer adapts themselves to the individual rhythm and dance of those they are conversing with and there can be a huge variation in movement. In this particular instance I have been challenged, insulted, taken on mystical journeys, had the most incredible dreams, but never, NEVER had a question directly answered. Truth to tell I loved the process, infuriating as it was at points. The following relates portions of conversations with a great artist who will change you. Recognise it, allow it, and for gods sakes try and see Ray Robinson’s work in actuality. Ray, I’m not a formally trained art critic so this discussion won’t be focused on academic interpretation of your work. Hopefully you wont be insulted by any ignorance on my part but instead regard it as way to communicate as freely as you want without having to adhere to any particular approach. I’ve read your ‘Grandmother Chronicles’ which perhaps gives an insight into your structuring of reality and art. Words are often so limited but this is an astounding piece of writing. The trauma of leaving your home in WW2 London, going to stay at your grandmother’s and undergoing an initiation of sorts into different perceptions of vision and interpretation is wonderful, as is the way you describe the re-presentation of perceptions of light, time and space. Now it would be easy for me to turn this into a conversation where I grill you about aspects of your work that I’m personally fascinated by, constantly interrupting you with my irritating over enthusiastic asides, but I won’t. I am an untrained artist who has written a few books and my personal creative interests, what I focus on and what I often write about, are spirituality and power that are contained within objects and art. The older I get the more I realise that the line between art and magic is so fine as to be non existent. So who are you? Very brave (I am not sure whether Ray is referring to himself or me for approaching him in that statement) Stephen Romano can cover the exterior for the last 40 years. (follow below link) I live in Nova Scotia but am originally from London, England. I am a very trained artist who has also written a few books. I have lived a life with the fact that there is no line at all. Nothing has ever inspired me. Mine has been a search for ‘why’ I do not know. I know that I do not know, but why the great gaps in a humans basic understanding? The senses to not sense but, still, humans survive. Inspiration surely is the source of the creative process and if creativity doesn’t exist, then what is an artist and who and what are you? What are the images you produce? Premeditated? Actual? No not premeditated. No not actual. No not channelled Allowed Allowed by who or what? By the subject. At the beginning of the ‘Grandmother Chronicles’ you use a quote by Magnus Roundtree ‘how you see the world shows how it behaves, change how you see the world, and the world changes’ And that leads into the memory of a child leaving the grey chaos of London to a world ordered by nature and a near crystalline perception that is the antithesis of before, but makes complete sense and is very real and actual. In a memo to Stephen Romano you said that,’ sculpture as a pure visual art form cannot and does not exist, Form has measurable three dimensions but is not to human vision, three dimensional. Human vision can only see half of any form. A simple glass globe described visually is half convex and half concave! Multiple views of a single object do not give an experience of the whole.’ This is fascinating – and challenging for the artist. This is developing into a conversation, which at the moment I cannot support. I know Stephen has a good reason for suggesting you talk to me. His project at the moment required that he asked me for some comments on my art…I suggested that this was not really a good idea given his understanding of my basic views. I sent him a quick and short sample of what my replies to his questions might be, in this case my basic view of my sculpture. His reply was to send you to me??? Ray and I worked through this and I began to realise that Ray was a visionary who communicates through his art. Interpretations of his work are incredibly important to him, and are something he wants translated properly and accurately. I also needed to try not to get too absorbed in Ray’s fascinating philosophies, and retain a degree of distance and professionalism. So we continued the dance… ‘Humans have two ways to understand reality, each world taken to the logical conclusion of living. First a world of conception and secondly a world seen with perception. However only if you understand these words and without the ‘isms’ of art doctrine you do not need to question me, however even after that there are still much to be learned.’ Ray Robinson Tell me about the series of paintings Sleep of Reason and Sleep of Reason II Stephen was mounting many shows on the subjects of witches. To me the basic truth of this was totally unreasonable until I thought of the sleep of reason in the midst of these people and after that, total empathy. As with all art, total empathy between artists, materials and subject. These works are not some airy fairy illustration; they are real. Real in fact, real in space, real in time. All I did was write it all down. All that is except the hanging…I could not write down the smell and the visual truth was more than my brush could summon. Witches? Poor Devils Each of the paintings has a true circumstance…and the result of my ‘being there’ My general observation of my contribution was, as I wrote at the time ‘When reason sleeps in the minds of the wise Witches burn and demons rise’

  • Stephen Romano

    The Virtual Viewing Room©™

    Selections from Stephen Romano Gallery, for information contact romanostephen@gmail.com

  • Stephen Romano

    "NO STARS - A TWIN PEAKS TRIBUTE EXHIBITION"

    "No Stars: A Twin Peaks Tribute Exhibition" feels like a contemporary gallery version of those original fan subcultures that sprung up during the 1960s and ‘70s (think "Star Trek" conventions, bootleg Grateful Dead albums, Marvel fanzines). Josh Stebbins’ portraits of the creators and characters of the "Twin Peaks" series, integrated with iconic symbols, landscapes, and set pieces, are reminiscent of old mimeographed sci-fi zine covers. The archival objects procured by gallerist/curator Stephen Romano betray a fan-level obsession with unlocking the mysterious sources of the show’s visual aspect; and other new works—by artists such as Natan Alexander, Alexis Palmer Karl, Jen Bandini, Luciana Lupe Vasconcelos, Daniel Gonçalves, Matthew Dutton, Barry William Hale, Blake Morrow, and Jill Watson—suggest a fictional ecosystem that has not only the potential to expand, but has history as well. Indeed, the more we touch things, and the more familiar we become with them, the more they take on a life of their own. In this way "No Stars" is almost like a primer on the creative process. A live performance by Rebekah Del Rio, whose song “No Stars” (composed by "Peaks" creator David Lynch) was featured in Episode 10 of "Twin Peaks: The Return," gave the opening night of the exhibition a stamp of authenticity, and brought out a deeper emotional connection between the audience and the objects around the room. In terms of new art created for the show, Alexis Palmer Karl’s painted human skull, encrusted with black and transparent crystals, had all the makings of a ritualistic relic. The artist, who is also a real-life practitioner of witchcraft, added the butterfly-frog creature of "Twin Peaks: The Return’s" iconic Episode 8, albeit with it exiting the mouth of the human figure rather than going into it. This suggests that what began inside the show’s fictional universe has now carried over to the real world. The connection between traditional occultism and liberties taken by modern television and cinema is also evident in this piece—a connection which embraces artistic license over academia (as well as the renewed interest in alternative spirituality). Josh Stebbins, whose twenty pencil drawings with mixed media elements such as collaged letters and used match sticks, was really the star of the show. His depictions elevated each character from the series to the level of religious icon. A diptych of Laura and Leland Palmer—daughter/father, incest victim/perpetrator, symbolic good/evil figures—is the most expressionist of his works, boasting a terrified Laura backed by a circle halo and a sociopathic Leland peering at her through a small window, both surrounded by skeins of blood red paint. Jen Bandini’s two emblem pictures directly reference 17th century German alchemical imagery—a genre whose open hands, all-seeing eyeballs, and floating geometric shapes influenced heavily the iconography of masonic artworks of the 19th century in America. According to co-creator Mark Frost’s two dossier-style "Peaks" tomes, fraternal lodges laid the groundwork for the series’ mysterious tone, as well. A spate of antiques from such secret societies are peppered throughout the exhibition—e.g. a Rebekah Lodge statue of the Venus De Milo set against a red velvet curtain backdrop and a series of Masonic postcards which seem to presage the "Twin Peaks" “Red Room.” These not only bind the show aesthetically but also lend credence to the notion that esoteric design provided the series (and "No Stars") with its strange sense of intellectual freedom. It is this kind of freedom in fact—from scientific positivism, secularism, consensus media, and bourgeois realism—that gave both the exhibition and the "Twin Peaks" universe in general its timely appeal. Red curtains, zig-zagged tiled floors, spooky owls, brotherhoods and lodges, doppelgangers, UFO abductions, violence, tragedy, a universe conspiring to bigger things than we can imagine from our limited vantage—in an era of growing uncertainly and mistrust towards established institutions, themes such as these are much more than titillating content to be consumed by mindless masses. They invite us to think outside the box; to imagine the possibility. It can start with a simple drawing of your favorite TV character. Yet who can say where it will lead? (Brian Chidester, 03/28/2020) Indeed, the more we touch things, and the more familiar we become with them, the more they take on a life of their own. In this way No Stars is almost like a primer on the creative process. A live performance by Rebekah Del Rio, whose song “No Stars” (composed by Peaks creator David Lynch) was featured in Episode 10 of Twin Peaks: The Return, gave the opening night of the exhibition a stamp of authenticity, and brought out a deeper emotional connection between the audience and the objects around the room. In terms of new art created for the show, Alexis Palmer Karl’s painted human skull, encrusted with black and transparent crystals, had all the makings of a ritualistic relic. The artist, who is also a real-life practitioner of witchcraft, added the butterfly-frog creature of Twin Peaks: The Return’s iconic Episode 8, albeit with it exiting the mouth of the human figure rather than going into it. This suggests that what began inside the show’s fictional universe has now carried over to the real world. The connection between traditional occultism and liberties taken by modern television and cinema is also evident in this piece—a connection which embraces artistic license over academia (as well as the renewed interest in alternative spirituality). Josh Stebbins, whose twenty pencil drawings with mixed media elements such as collaged letters and used match sticks, was really the star of the show. His depictions elevated each character from the series to the level of religious icon. A diptych of Laura and Leland Palmer—daughter/father, incest victim/perpetrator, symbolic good/evil figures—is the most expressionist of his works, boasting a terrified Laura backed by a circle halo and a sociopathic Leland peering at her through a small window, both surrounded by skeins of blood red paint. Jen Bandini’s two emblem pictures directly reference 17th century German alchemical imagery—a genre whose open hands, all-seeing eyeballs, and floating geometric shapes influenced heavily the iconography of masonic artworks of the 19th century in America. According to co-creator Mark Frost’s two dossier-style Peaks tomes, fraternal lodges laid the groundwork for the series’ mysterious tone, as well. A spate of antiques from such secret societies are peppered throughout the exhibition—e.g. a Rebekah Lodge statue of the Venus De Milo set against a red velvet curtain backdrop and a series of Masonic postcards which seem to presage the Twin Peaks" Red Room. These not only bind the show aesthetically but also lend credence to the notion that esoteric design provided the series (and No Stars) with its strange sense of intellectual freedom. It is this kind of freedom in fact—from scientific positivism, secularism, consensus media, and bourgeois realism—that gave both the exhibition and the Twin Peaks universe in general its timely appeal. Red curtains, zig-zagged tiled floors, spooky owls, brotherhoods and lodges, doppelgangers, UFO abductions, violence, tragedy, a universe conspiring to bigger things than we can imagine from our limited vantage—in an era of growing uncertainly and mistrust towards established institutions, themes such as these are much more than titillating content to be consumed by mindless masses. They invite us to think outside the box; to imagine the possibility. It can start with a simple drawing of your favorite TV character. Yet who can say where it will lead? (Brian Chidester, 03/28/2020)

  • Stephen Romano

    JOSH STEBBINS "NO STARS - A TWIN PEAKS TRIBUTE EXHIBITION"

    Josh Stebbins "NO STARS - A TWIN PEAKS tribute exhibition.

    latest works

    • unknown artist

      Grimoire Pages, late 19th century - presnet
      15.3 x 11.9 inch (h x w)
    • unknown artist

      WW2 War Painting with Satan, 1940's
      11.1 x 11.1 inch (h x w)
      gouache on panel
      USD 2500
    • Walter Bird

      "Devil Dancer", 1930
      13.3 x 11.1 inch (h x w)
      Photogravure
      USD 1000
    • John Everard

      “ADAM'S FIFTH RIB”, 1935
      13.7 x 11.1 inch (h x w)
      Photogravure
      USD 700
    • unknown artist

      52R, Illustration, possibly for pulp magazine, circa 1940's
      15.4 x 11.1 inch (h x w)
      pen and ink and pencil on paper
      USD 1200
    • Alexis Palmer Karl

      "The Mother", 2019
      31 x 26.9 cm (h x w)
      Resin, bone, Hand Dyed silver leaf, insect wings pyrite
    • reasonsleeps
    • rrttd
    • Ray Robinson

      "July 1692", 2015
      25 x 18.7 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "When Witches Burn and Demons Rise", 2015
      18.7 x 25.9 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Chose - Left or Right" , 2015
      18.7 x 25.9 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Two Witches Burned In Madson Heath, March 22nd", 2015
      18.7 x 25.8 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "The Beginnings of Religion, Leaping the Betane Fire" , 2015
      18.7 x 25.9 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "The Scrying Pool", 2015
      25.9 x 18.7 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Battleground" , 2015
      18.7 x 25.9 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "The Day the Witch Lya Burchett was Given Short Shift and Hanged. Her Body Burned in the Grounds of Dolbadarn Castle" , 2015
      25.9 x 18.7 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Janey Horne 1727" , 2015
      25.9 x 18.7 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Beltane, Now It Begins", 2015
      25.9 x 18.7 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Birth of a Witch", 2015
      25.9 x 18.7 inch (h x w)
    • Ray Robinson

      "Samboism Fire in the Shadow of Dolbadarn Castle" , 2015
      18.7 x 25.9 inch (h x w)
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