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SPARCinLA

SPARC in LA

SPARC in LA

3D exhibitions

  • SPARC in LA

    Patchwork Healing Blanket: Piece by Piece and Country by Country

    08 Aug 2020 – 19 Sep 2020

    The Patchwork Healing Blanket: Piece-by-Piece and Country-by-Country is an international textile art project that unites generations of women in a global movement against gender-based violence and the destruction of Mother Earth. In 2019 a group of women artists from Oaxaca and Mexico City, led by Founder/Director Marietta Bernstorff, started working together to develop the Patchwork Healing Blanket/La Manta de Curacíon in response to an outrageous increase in the murder of women in Mexico that year. The artists began to invite women from all over Mexico and the world to participate in making a patchwork cloth piece that speaks out against the violent crimes we are all witnessing through news outlets and social media. The result was tremendous – 600 patchworks were sent to Mexico City from San Miguel Allende, Tijuana, Oaxaca, Chile, Argentina, Guatemala, Brasil, Germany, Greece, England, Spain, Canada, and the United States. The patchworks were sewn together to create large blankets that were displayed in the Zócalo in Mexico City for one day in February 2020, creating a powerful public art installation and a celebration of healing with artists, educators, healers, women, children, and allies. The Patchwork Healing Blanket will be on view for the public through a virtual art gallery by SPARC from August 8 to September 19. Join us in the virtual gallery for an installation of patchworks by feminist artists, survivors, and advocates from ten countries as women, children, and allies across borders call for an end to the global pandemic of gender-based violence. “We believe that the problems we are facing towards women and children are connected with the abuse and rape of Mother Earth. Our land, our water, our air are being destroyed due to greed and power. We believe we are all interconnected with nature, and respecting our surroundings and our communities is respecting others and ourselves. We need to come together to make conscious efforts to change our communities and countries to help us understand the importance of Mother Earth and all species that inhabit this planet.” – Marietta Bernstorff, Exhibition Curator and Founder/Director of Patchwork Healing Blanket

  • SPARC in LA

    Stoner Avenue Portraits

    01 Dec 2020 – 20 Jan 2021

  • SPARC in LA

    Pico Middle School Self-Portraits

  • SPARC in LA

    Why We Won't Just Leave - What Alaska Is Telling the World About Climate Change

    27 Feb 2021 – 10 Apr 2021

    To the outside traveler, encountering signs of climate change in Alaska can be staggering. To those who call Alaska home, it is increasingly alarming and very real. Villages are collapsing into melting permafrost and eroding into the sea. Glaciers are receding exorbitantly fast, exposing rock that has been covered for ten thousand years. Melting sea ice makes it almost impossible for species like the polar bear to survive. Humbling stories abound of lack of food due to changing caribou migrations, salmon runs and subsistence patterns, and lives lost through thin ice in places that were once safe to traverse. In Los Angeles, climate change has a different feel. Nitrogen oxide in thick smog contributes to increasingly warm temperatures, wildfires surge dangerously into communities, and the warming ocean brings deadly algal blooms and marine animal die-offs. In both Alaska and Southern California, hundreds of people have been displaced due to climate change. Why We Won’t Just Leave highlights the responses of Alaskans to their rapidly changing environment and delivers messages that are key for us all if we are to reverse climate catastrophe and cultivate a healthy, vibrant future for generations to come. From activists delivering testimonies in D.C. and artists revealing truth with beauty, to scientists studying methane released from melting permafrost, Alaska has a message for the world. Why We Won’t Just Leave features portraits, paintings, photography, stories, and video and audio profiles of over 15 artists, scientists, writers and activists responding to climate change in Alaska. The exhibition debuts virtually in the SPARC virtual gallery in February 2021, introducing Alaska as a major player in the world’s climate crisis to an audience separated by 3000 miles, but not separate from its impacts. Ancillary programs will include a panel talk, a participatory workshop with an artist, and youth programming. Attendees will leave the exhibition enriched by the information provided by exhibition participants, with tangible connections and action points, and inspiration for enacting change in their own communities.

    latest works

    • Thank You
      90 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
    • Resilience
      70 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
    • Action
      70 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
    • Community
      70 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
    • Connection
      70 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
    • Introduction
      76 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
    • 26.2 Sophie Sakar and Marie Sakar, 2021
      39.4 x 70 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Interviewed by Lindsay Carron
    • Jessica Thornton

      41.5 Statement, 2021
      44.4 x 23 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Video
    • Jessica Thornton

      58. Today We Dream, Tomorrow We Build, 2020
      50 x 46.8 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Pen and Ink & Digital
    • Keri Oberly

      57. Untitled, 2019
      36 x 47 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Photograph
    • Keri Oberly

      56. Untitled, 2018
      36 x 54 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Photograph
    • Keri Oberly

      55. Untitled, 2019
      36 x 54 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Photograph
    • Keri Oberly

      54. Untitled, 2018
      36 x 54 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Photograph
    • Keri Oberly

      53. Untitled, 2019
      36 x 54 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Photograph
    • Bill Hanson

      52. Rainforest Cascade, 2020
      72 x 48.4 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Photograph
    • Apay’uq Moore

      51. Ana’s (Mom’s) House, 2019
      40 x 73.2 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Apay’uq Moore

      50. Our Way of Life, 2015
      55 x 39.1 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Apay’uq Moore

      49. Gram and Girl, 2020
      55 x 42.8 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Jessica Thornton

      48. Just Transition, 2019
      50 x 50 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Pen and Ink & Digital
    • Kate Troll

      47. Making Juneau Alaska’s Model of Sustainability, 2020
      48 x 64 x 0.5 inch (h x w x d)
      Testimonial. Audio Recording. Photograph by Bill Hanson.