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Sarah Louise Wilson

Sarah Louise Wilson

Sarah Louise Wilson

Sarah Louise Wilson

Sarah Louise Wilson is an artist based in California. She writes, directs, produces, paints, and acts. Her courage puts her on an edge that cannot be fabricated; rather, it comes as a natural part of who she is and what she stands for.


In 2010, with her company Stella Bella Productions, she penned and starred in her pseudo-autobiographical romantic comedy “Jelly”, starring Natasha Lyonne (Orange Is the New Black) and Hollywood icon Ed McMahon. The script alone attracted name talent and funded the film into release. After screening in competition at several renowned film festivals, the film went on to win four Accolade awards and is represented by Cinetic Media. It has since been released on Netflix, Fancast, Hulu, PBS, and The Sundance Channel.


Throughout her career, Sarah wrote and directed short films, plays, music videos, documentaries— Anything she could get her hand on. In early 2016, when Sarah was living and in Almaty, Kazakhstan, she shot her feature film “No Exit” entirely on location. The movie went on to win multiple awards and was written up by Esquire, Good Housekeeping, and Variety.



She released her debut novel S & M in the Fall of 2020.



She is gearing up for a solo online art exhibition for late April 2021.


"STYLISH AND STRANGE ENOUGH TO MARK

SARAH LOUISE WILSON AND NEAL THIBEDEAU AS HELMERS TO WATCH." - Variety


www.sarahlouisewilson.com

3D exhibitions

  • Sarah Louise Wilson

    New Eyes

    07 May 2021 – 07 Sep 2021

    On my father’s side, I am a descendant of enslaved people, and on my mother’s side, I am a descendant of European immigrants. Memories, dreams, and history have all played a part in making this current collection come to fruition.  All of the artwork presented here, flowed out of me between February 2021 - May 2021. It was then I realized that I needed to “worry about myself”. Something I heard growing up frequently but never really understood what it meant beyond minding my own business until 2020 hit like a brick. Then the words my father and mother had said (and still say to me), “worry about yourself” seemed to be talking about self-love instead of worrying about everyone else. As my friend Ashli Haynes says, “You have to heal yourself before you can heal anyone else.” I could not paint for the entirety of 2020. I was in a dark spot. So, it took time to formulate my thoughts after so many years of trauma both witnessed and personally experienced. This is partly because I am a perfectionist, and as many have pointed out to me over the years, it can be a crippling disposition. With that in mind, I decided to get free of it and just paint because no matter how hard I try, I will never get it perfect— not an idea, not life, not anything, so I just painted. This show is an attempt to express me and hopefully, by doing so, something will resonate in others because I know I am not alone in my pain. I know I am not alone in my desire to heal through love. The show is a mixture of oil on canvas, acrylic on canvas, and wood-burned art, better known as pyrography. I chose to burn images into reclaimed wood for two reasons. One, it was available after my parents remodeled their newly purchased home— first built around 1914— and two because it seemed to fit some themes I wanted to explore in the show.  The wood is old but sturdy and certainly as imperfect as our shared history. My parents were kind enough to give me the wood after I told them that I had an idea about burning some wood art. As I  burned images of my personal icons, I came across some of the evidence of demolition in the form of gashes and holes. It reminded me of when I was a child and would draw on the back of my father's marked-up blueprints. It felt like a collaboration. The wood proved to be difficult to burn images in to but that in itself seemed to be a metaphor for what I am trying to express— our history — our shared history regarding The African Diaspora is difficult and imperfect and ugly.  I turned the gashes and knots in the wood into flowers and birds instead of pretending like they were not there. Much like how I do not want to pretend like our shared history is not what it really is. Slavery happened and continues today in the form of our prison system and mindset. I burned images of people I found to be powerful and influential icons into the wood. These are not all of the people I find influential but I had to stop at some point or I would have painted all of my siblings, my beautiful in-laws, my sweet husband whose unflinching love and support have taught me, inspired me and been the fuel to my fire— Langston Hughes, Toni Morrison, Richard Wright, friends, and so many more but alas, I only have so much wall space for this exhibition. That said, I hope you enjoy it. This is by no means a complete representation of all those who have contributed to my wokeness. It is merely a taste. Curated by Sarah Louise Wilson & Ali Sreij ( ALL SALES ARE FINAL )

    latest works

    • My father's police story, 2021
      12 x 24 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
    • Artist Statement
      10 x 15 inch (h x w)
    • Sarah Louise Wilson "New Eyes"
      10 x 15 inch (h x w)
    • A Tree's Story
      12 x 24 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Unarmed, 2021
      48 x 24 x 0.8 inch (h x w x d)
      # acrylic on canvas
      USD 10600
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Mom & Dad, 2021
      12 x 9.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Fred Hampton, 2021
      11.5 x 9 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 600
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Dick Gregory, 2021
      12 x 8.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 600
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Martin Luther King Jr., 2021
      20 x 16 x 0.6 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 1000
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Kwame Ture, 2021
      12 x 10 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 600
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Sojourner Truth, 2021
      12 x 22.5 x 2 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 700
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Joe Louis, 2021
      12.5 x 16 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 600
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Bayard Rustin, 2021
      8 x 13.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 500
    • Sarah Lousie Wilson

      Claudette Colvin, 2021
      12.5 x 10 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 650
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      James Baldwin, 2021
      13 x 13 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 1000
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Huey P. Newton, 2021
      18 x 9.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 800
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Fannie Lou Hamer, 2021
      8 x 13 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 650
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Harriet Tubman, 2021
      9.5 x 12 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 500
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Octavia E. Butler, The Mother Of Afro Futurism , 2021
      17.5 x 12 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 800
    • Sarah Louise Wilson

      Jimi Hendrix, 2021
      13.5 x 8.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      #Burning #Wood #Acrylic
      USD 700
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