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Richard Saltoun Gallery

RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

Founded in 2012, Richard Saltoun Gallery is based in Mayfair, London. The gallery specialises in contemporary art, with an emphasis on Feminist, Conceptual and Performance artists from the 1960s onwards. It is guided by a strong focus on rediscovering the work of important yet under-recognised artists through a yearly exhibition programme at its central location on Dover Street and participation in numerous art fairs around the world.


41 Dover Street
London, UK
W1S4NS

3D exhibitions

  • RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

    Violet Costello: Bringing Home Baby

    15 Sep 2020 – 31 Oct 2020

    ‘Bringing Home Baby’ is an online presentation by Violet COSTELLO, winner of the 2020 ‘Procreate Project – Mother Art Prize Online Award’. Featuring new paintings and works on paper created over the last two years, the exhibition marks the first show in a commercial gallery context for the artist. It launches as part of Richard Saltoun Gallery’s Women 2.0 series, a new programme of online exhibitions presenting work by non-represented artists with the aim of providing an additional platform and visibility for women artists.

  • RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

    SU RICHARDSON ‘Wonderwoman'

    01 Aug 2020 – 31 Aug 2020

    A pioneer of 1970s Feminist Art, Su RICHARDSON played a key role in revalidating craft as a fine art form and its potential as a means of disrupting the white cube aesthetic. Simultaneously celebrating, exploiting and subverting feminine craft skills such as crocheting and embroidery, Richardson’s homemade objects stir the unconscious of domesticity and femininity and their mutual implications with humour and dexterity. Richardson became known through her association with the Postal Art Event that took place in Britain in the mid-1970s. What started as a collaborative project to connect women in different cities through exchange of artworks in the post gradually evolved into a ground-breaking art project ‘Feministo’ and a series of exhibitions and installations around the U.K., including the acclaimed presentation ‘Portrait of the Artist as Housewife’ at the ICA, London in 1977. Richardson’s D.I.Y. aesthetic took feminist art in the 1970s in different directions - fitting her art practice around motherhood, work and household tasks. Her use of crochet was deliberate - traditionally considered a woman’s skill that Richardson aimed to politicise and imbue with greater meaning. Artworks from this period were made out of self-reflection, with several pieces created for herself and friends. They were not intended as standalone, anonymous art objects to be ‘elevated’ into a fine art context and removed from the domestic and personal sphere. Her humorously subversive aesthetic anticipated contemporary countercultures and movements that combined craft with street art, such as yarn bombing and guerrilla knitting, and was a precursor to a younger generation of female British artists who combined visual puns with domestic objects, including perhaps most notably Sarah Lucas in her seminal works Self Portrait with Fried Egg (1996) or Pauline Bunny (1997). By injecting familiar household objects, like eggs, nylons and stiletto shoes, into art aided the process of defamiliarisation and what art historian Alexandra Kokoli has coined ‘undoing homeliness’ destabilising the naturalised connection between women and the home. Richard Saltoun’s online exhibition ‘Su RICHARDSON: Wonderwoman’ features many of Richardson’s key works from the 1970s, presented alongside new pieces created for the show. The works continue to play on ideas of craft, memory, childhood, friendships and motherhood while introducing a new direction in Richardson’s work that deals with ageing and the facelessness of older women. These new pieces, including one of only four life-size pieces ever created by the artist, were realised at the start of a UK-wide lockdown brought on by the international outbreak of Covid-19, which provided Richardson with a unique period of time to begin making again and offered a revitalised moment of self-reflection, now from the perspective of a 73-year-old woman rather than a young mother.

  • RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

    Jo Spence: Photo Therapy

    07 Sep 2020 – 15 Oct 2020

  • RICHARD SALTOUN GALLERY

    BOB LAW: Ideas, Energies, Transmutations

    03 Sep 2020 – 31 Oct 2020

    CURATED BY ANNA LOVATT Beginning in the late 1950s, Bob LAW (b. 1934 – d. 2004) developed an abstract vocabulary that was rooted in corporeal experience yet oriented toward metaphysical concerns. Audacious in their minimalism, his drawings and paintings were shown alongside works by Jo Baer, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mangold and Robert Ryman in the early 1970s. Unlike these New York-based artists, however, Law’s work evolved out of an engagement with the English landscape and an esoteric range of interests including alchemy, nature mysticism, numerology, and palaeontology. This exhibition demonstrates how Law invested austere forms with affective, wry, or whimsical qualities, contributing to a re-enchantment of abstract art that has continued since his death in 2004.

    latest works

    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      STRONG VAGINA (31 JAN 1968), 1968
      40 x 45 cm (h x w)
      Laminate poem object (cellophane, typewriter ribbon, stapled, collaged)
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      ELECTRIC ENGLAND (October 6, 1967), 1967
      51 x 33 cm (h x w)
      Laminate poem object (collaged, offset text, ink drawing)
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      langwid, 1967
      40 x 40 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Celluloid transparency
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      langwid / hommage to Ronald Firbank (16th October 1967), 1967
      36 x 51 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Laminated assemblage (recto-verso, offset text, Glue, feather, metal gear)
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      the divinely bladed thunder bride 291269, 1969
      36 x 39.1 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Ink typed on paper
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      Typestract - 180764 (Blue), 1964
      30 x 36.5 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Ink typed on paper
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      For ew, 1964
      34.5 x 41 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Ink typed on paper
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      Typestract 200464, 1964
      34.5 x 41 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Ink typed on paper
    • Dom Sylvester HOUEDARD

      Sand Rock Tide, 1964
      68.5 x 95.2 x 5 cm (h x w x d)
      Silkscreen on paper
    • Alexis Hunter

      Nina fixing her car, 1980
      60 x 150 cm (h x w)
      18 Gelatin silver print with ink additions and 1 Gelatin silver print
    • Akexis Hunter

      Gender Confusion: Succubus/Incubus, 1977
      114 x 40 cm (h x w)
      10 colour Xeroxes in 2 framed panels
    • Alexis Hunter

      Approach to Fear III: Taboo - Demystify, 1976
      57 x 43 cm (h x w)
      30 colour photographs, mounted on paper
    • Alexis Hunter

      Goddess Harnessing Muse, 1983
      38 x 28 cm (h x w)
      etching
    • Alexis Hunter

      A Goddess confronting Patriarchy, 1983
      38 x 56 cm (h x w)
      etching
    • Alexis Hunter

      Untitled (Woman and Beast series),, c. 1985
      10.6 x 12 cm (h x w)
      gouache and ink on paper
    • Alexis Hunter

      Untitled (Woman and Beast series),, c. 1985
      9.6 x 10.4 cm (h x w)
      gouache and ink on paper
    • Alexis Hunter

      Co-dependence, 1997
      30 x 42 cm (h x w)
      Acrylic and pen on card
    • Alexis Hunter

      Lust in pursuit of Desire, 1989
      76 x 59 cm (h x w)
      etching, hand coloured
    • Alexis Hunter

      Nina fixing her car, 1980
      20.2 x 25.3 cm (h x w)
      Gelatin silver print
    • Alexis Hunter

      Approach to Fear XI: Effeminacy - productive action, 1977
      48.3 x 71.8 cm (h x w)
      10 gelatin silver prints, each with ink additions and hand-tinted, mounted on board, with ink inscriptions by the artist
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