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ReflectSpace Gallery

ReflectSpace Gallery

ReflectSpace Gallery

ReflectSpace Gallery at the Glendale Central Library is an exhibition space designed to explore and reflect on major human atrocities, genocides and civil rights violations. Immersive in conception, ReflectSpace is a hybrid space that exhibits contemporary art as well as archives, employing installation, technology and interactive media to engage viewers on an emotional and personal level. ReflectSpace interrogates current-day global human rights issues and reflects the past and present of Glendale’s communal fabric.


ReflectSpace Gallery
@ Glendale Central Library
222 E. Harvard St
Glendale, CA 91205

3D exhibitions

  • ReflectSpace Gallery

    Nowhere and Everywhere: Indigenous in America

    26 Oct 2020 – 31 Jan 2021

    In celebration of the Native American Heritage Month, Glendale Library Arts and Culture and ReflectSpace Gallery is proud to present “Nowhere and Everywhere: Indigenous in America” an exhibition that investigates the myriad ways in which Native Americans are represented and misrepresented through popular culture imagery while creating a counterpoint to this imagery through humanistic photography and contemporary art by two Native artists: Navajo artist and filmmaker Pamela J. Peters and Kiowa photographer Horace Poolaw. The exhibit also examines the insidious spaces, imagery and critical approach of the California Mission System. “Nowhere and Everywhere” collects a plethora of stereotypical indigenous imagery that are pervasive in our culture: from the most surprising as well as the most mundane places. From cigarette cards, to fruit crate labels, to album covers and National Park adverts, this imagery lodges Native America at the very center of the American psyche. Ironically, it is the very same psyche and colonial agenda that has done everything possible to eliminate Native American culture from this land. Often other cultures are also included in the stereotypical representations that accompany this imagery. As an authentic and forceful counterpoint, Pamela J. Peters’ (who co-curated “Erasure” at ReflectSpace Gallery in 2019) work subverts this imagery with wit and insight through her series called “Real NDNZ Re-Take Hollywood.” These intimate photographs recreate iconic movie star portraits from the days of classical Hollywood cinema featuring contemporary Native American actors and disrupt and decolonizes their clichéd portrayals. Native American actors stand in the shoes of Cary Grant, Audry Hepburn and others and allows us to imagine what could have been if the settler-colonial state was not murderous but believed in coexistence. Also providing a counterpoint is the deeply humanistic photography of Horace Poolaw (1906-1984): a notable Kiowa photographer and one of the first professional Native American photographers of the early 20th century. Poolaw photographed from inside his Kiowa community in Oklahoma and documented a time of great changes for Native Americans. His photographs differ significantly from photographs of Native peoples by non-Native photographers, like Edward Curtis, which often stereotyped Native Americans as a “vanishing race,” or as peoples unable to adapt to modernity. In contrast, Poolaw depicted Native people’s day-to-day life, their vibrancy and pride in their culture and way of life. He photographed himself, his family, friends, and Kiowa leaders. “Nowhere and Everywhere” also addresses one of the most insidious spaces of colonization: the Mission system. The exhibit brings together critical text, historical photographs and popular imagery to contextualize the role and function of the missions as sites of incarceration and subjugation of Native Americans. “Nowhere and Everywhere: Indigenous in America” runs from October 26, 2020 to Januay 31, 2021 in a 3D virtual gallery. “Nowhere and Everywhere: Indigenous in America” is part of the Glendale Library, Arts & Culture’s (GLAC), the Southern California Library Cooperative and Niche Academy’s Be The Change series focused on: Inclusion – Diversity – Equity – Antiracism. Be The Change events will build collective understanding of systemic racism, elevate the voices and stories of BIPOC, and inspire our community to be the change. The Be The Change series takes place in conjunction with such commemorations as Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month, Native American Heritage Month, Black History Month, Armenian History Month, Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month, and LGBTQ+ Pride. The series will also examine the one-year anniversary of the 2020 racial justice protests and 100-year anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre. The series will include virtual lectures, exhibits, and online programming from authors, curators, historians, panelists, speakers, and GLAC staff. Be The Change is sponsored by the City of Glendale, California Arts and Culture Commission, with funding from the City of Glendale Urban Art Fund. Glendale Library Arts and Culture and ReflectSpace Gallery acknowledge that we are here as guests of the Tongva peoples who are the traditional land caretakers of Tovaangar (LA Basin & Channel Islands).

  • ReflectSpace Gallery

    Beyond the River: Free Zone-DMZ, The City that Lost the River

    21 Dec 2020 – 21 Mar 2021

    Glendale Library, Arts & Culture and ReflectSpace Gallery in cooperation with the City of Gimpo, South Korea and the Gimpo Cultural Foundation is proud to present “Beyond the River: Free Zone-DMZ, The City that Lost the River,” an exhibition that reflects on borders and divisions, specifically the far-reaching impact of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea at the City of Gimpo. The DMZ is a 2.5 mile wide swath that separates North and South Korea at around the 38th parallel. At its western edge is the estuary of the Han River where it flows into the waters of the Yellow Sea and where the City of Gimpo is situated. Even though the Armistice of 1953 designated the estuary as a “Neutral” or “Free” zone for commercial maritime travel, neither side has allowed this to happen. Gimpo, an ancient city with a history of maritime trade, has lost its river. In the exhibition, “Beyond the River: Free Zone-DMZ, The City that Lost the River,” several Korean artists reflect on this ephemeral and inaccessible border/river and consider how a city navigates the treacherous waters of partition. The artists in the exhibition are: Han Ho, Lee Lee Nam, Lee Tae Soo, Kim Seung Woo & Cho Doo Young, Lee Ho Jin, and Floworks. “Beyond the River: Free Zone-DMZ, The City that Lost the River” is curated by Monica Hye Yeon Jun and Ara & Anahid Oshagan and runs December 21, 2020 - March 21, 2021. “Beyond the River” is held simultaneously at the Gimpo Museum of Art in Gimpo, South Korea and ReflectSpace Gallery in Glendale. The exhibition is organized in cooperation with the City of Glendale and the City of Gimpo, the Gimpo Cultural Foundation, the Korean Foundation for International Cultural Exchange. The exhibition is part of a new cultural exchange program with the City of Gimpo, a sister city of Glendale. Floworks by Lee Jae Hyung & Park Junk Min is a technology and artificial intelligence based work that continually streams information from the internet to create art. Here, the border, the DMZ, and Korean division is at issue and information is sourced from interviews and the internet to create digital faces that morph and change emotions as the information content ebbs and flows. The installation includes a searchlight projection, reminiscent of the militarized border that is continuously surveilled. Han Ho reaches deep into history to create a massive work both spiritual as well as darkly human. Ho’s “The Last Supper of the 21st Century” replete with Jesus and full rank of the apostles, mimics the composition and texture of Da Vinci’s famed last supper painting but here Ho substitutes weapons of war for dining utensils. An edgy and unpredictable meal is taking place that could devolve into violence and destruction at any moment. This narrative of sudden conflict in mundane settings is all too real considering the military postures of the two Koreas. Not unlike Han Ho’s work, Lee Tea Soo’s sculpture is delicately balanced between harmony and disaster. Perched on an untenably thin edge, a massive boulder seems to hover in mid-air above a meager steel stand. The boulder could topple at any moment. Where will it land? North or South? Either way, it will create massive waves of disruption. A divided Korea is the very undercurrent of Moogy’s portraits of Korean war veterans. Witnesses to the inner mechanics of the division, these somber portraits are presented as halves, speaking to the impact of the divided Korean peninsula and raising the question: where is the other half of the portrait? Across the Han River, beyond the river, on the Northern side. But, of course, it could just as easily be viewed from the other side. Lee Lee Nam deals with large universal themes of pain and healing through the often intense and jarring interaction between light and dark but also meditative and fluid movements of form. His immersive videos vacillate between these two extremes and incorporate histories of war and displacement. Lee Ho Jin works in color and abstraction that represent geographic features, historical images and other data. The current series “Unlimited Thought” addresses borders and politically unstable times. The shapes and forms in his work echo disrupted rivers, seas and land and invite the audience to meditate on the geological features that unite and separate communities and countries. All the works in “Beyond the River” underscore the symbiotic but fraught relationship between North and South Korea: a co-existence that is delicately balanced between everyday normalcy and the potential for sudden catastrophe. The artists strive to look beyond the river and to imagine new futurities for the Korean peninsula.

  • ReflectSpace Gallery

    dispLAced: Communities Beneath Dodger Stadium

    May 9, 1959, is a day that still lives in the memory of many in the Mexican-American community. On that day, the last residents of Chavez Ravine were forcibly evicted from their homes by Los Angeles County Sheriffs. Aurora Vargas, a war widow, was physically removed from her home, manhandled by four officers and rammed into a squad car. Dodger Stadium was built on top of their bulldozed homes, gardens and playgrounds. It is a story that black and brown communities know too well: ouster from their generational homes by government-backed business interests. ReflectSpace Gallery presents a multi-disciplinary reflection on the bitter history and contemporary legacy of the displacement of the Mexican-American communities of Chavez Ravine. Historical and archival material stand alongside work by contemporary artists that address issues of government-supported dispossession and violence against black and brown bodies that continue unabated today. Archival images in “dispLAced” are from Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection, UCLA Digital Library and USC Digital Library. Artist Favianna Rodriguez, Jerolyn Crute, Miyo Stevens-Gandara, Wayne Perry and Weston Taruya contribute serigraphs to the exhibit courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art and artist Luis Genaro-Garcia participates with collage work. LA Meekly podcast, hosted by Greg Gonzalez, contextualizes “dispLAced” in West’s historical continuum. “dispLAced” is part of the Glendale Library, Arts & Culture’s (GLAC), the Southern California Library Cooperative and Niche Academy’s Be The Change series focused on: Inclusion – Diversity – Equity – Antiracism. Be The Change events will build collective understanding of systemic racism, elevate the voices and stories of BIPOC, and inspire our community to be the change. Be The Change is sponsored by the City of Glendale, California Arts and Culture Commission, with funding from the City of Glendale Urban Art Fund. www.eglendalelac.org/bethechange ReflectSpace Gallery is an exhibition space inside Downtown Central Library in Glendale designed to explore and reflect on major human atrocities, genocides, social justice and civil rights violations. Immersive in conception, ReflectSpace is a hybrid gallery space that exhibits contemporary art as well as archive, employing installation, technology and interactive media to interrogate current-day global human rights issues and reflect on the past and present of Glendale’s communal fabric. www.reflectspace.org ReflectSpace Gallery is partially supported by the Glendale Library, Arts & Culture Trust.

    latest works

    • Beyond the River Title Image
    • Curatorial Introduction (in Korean), 2020
      Video, 57 secs
    • Curatorial Statement
    • Beyond the River: Free Zone-DMZ, The City that Lost the River
    • Lee Lee Nam / 이이남

      Reborn Light-memory and healing, 2020
      Beam projector, 20 mins (2 min preview)
    • Moogy Seungwoo Kim / 김승우 & Dooyoung / 조두영 Cho

      Sunboga / 先報歌, 2020
      36 x 48 inch (h x w)
      Digital printing on fabric, Multi-channel loop media, Slide film projector and projection media, Installation
    • Lee Jae Hyung/이재형 & Park Jung Min/박정민

      Face _Free Zone , 2020
      Beam projector, variable installation
    • Moogy Seungwoo Kim / 김승우 & Dooyoung / 조두영 Cho

      Sunboga / 先報歌, 2020
      92 x 72 inch (h x w)
      Digital printing on fabric, Multi-channel loop media, Slide film projector and projection media, Installation
    • Moogy Seungwoo Kim / 김승우 & Dooyoung / 조두영 Cho

      Sunboga / 先報歌, 2020
      92 x 72 inch (h x w)
      Digital printing on fabric, Multi-channel loop media, Slide film projector and projection media, Installation
    • Moogy Seungwoo Kim / 김승우 & Dooyoung / 조두영 Cho

      Sunboga / 先報歌, 2020
      92 x 72 inch (h x w)
      Digital printing on fabric, Multi-channel loop media, Slide film projector and projection media, Installation
    • Moogy Seungwoo Kim / 김승우 & Dooyoung / 조두영 Cho

      Sunboga / 先報歌, 2020
      92 x 32 inch (h x w)
      Digital printing on fabric, Multi-channel loop media, Slide film projector and projection media, Installation
    • Lee Tae Soo/이태수

      Stone on Edge , 2020
      48 x 138 inch (h x w)
      mixed media, variable installation
    • HanHo / 한호

      Eternal Light - 21c Last Supper (Panel 9), 2017
      72 x 42 inch (h x w)
      Hanji and oil painting on canvas, ink and charcoal, sound interactive LED (1400X300X100 cm )
    • HanHo / 한호

      Eternal Light - 21c Last Supper (Panel 8), 2016
      72 x 46 inch (h x w)
      Hanji and oil painting on canvas, ink and charcoal, sound interactive LED (1400X300X100 cm )
    • HanHo / 한호

      Eternal Light - 21c Last Supper (Panel 2-4)
      72 x 138 inch (h x w)
      Hanji and oil painting on canvas, ink and charcoal, sound interactive LED (1400X300X100 cm )
    • Han Ho / 한호

      Eternal Light - 21c Last Supper (Panel 5-7)
      72 x 138 inch (h x w)
      Hanji and oil painting on canvas, ink and charcoal, sound interactive LED (1400X300X100 cm )
    • Lee Ho Jin/이호진

      Unlimited Thought, #1, 2020
      52 x 36 inch (h x w)
      mixed media
    • Lee Ho Jin/이호진

      Unlimited Thought, #2, 2020
      38 x 36 inch (h x w)
      mixed media
    • Lee Ho Jin/이호진

      Unlimited Thought, #3, 2020
      36 x 108 inch (h x w)
      mixed media
    • HanHo / 한호

      Eternal Light - 21c Last Supper (Panel 1), 2017
      72.5 x 46 inch (h x w)
      Hanji and oil painting on canvas, ink and charcoal, sound interactive LED (1400X300X100 cm )
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