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Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

Located in the Parnell Square Cultural Quarter, the heart of Georgian Dublin, the Olivier Cornet Art Gallery is today one of Ireland's most dynamic modern & contemporary fine art galleries.


We represent accomplished and exciting Irish and international visual artists working in a variety of media such as painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, fine prints and digital art.


Our space is situated on the ground floor of a beautiful Georgian building, recently refurbished and once the town residence of The Lord Norbury. It comprises two large rooms: one for temporary exhibitions, the other a storage area where our visitors can browse through over 250 works by our represented and invited artists. All artworks are available for purchase and prices start at 175 Euro for unframed fine art prints for instance. Gift vouchers are available too.


Our independent contemporary Irish art gallery, sometimes referred to as The OCG, hosts solo art exhibitions, as well as curated group shows known for their quality and originality.


3 Great Denmark Street
Dublin 1
Ireland

info@oliviercornetgallery.com
+353 (0)872887261

3D exhibitions

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Sitzfleisch, a solo exhibition by Susanne Wawra

    18 May 2020 – 12 Jun 2020

    Sitzfleisch (Sitting Flesh) or The German Art Of Sitting (On Your Behind) Susanne Wawra visually tackles the German concept of Sitzfleisch, one of these compound words that express a certain quality that can't quite be grasped in the English language. Literally translated, sitzfleisch means 'sitting flesh' or 'sitting meat', a term for one's behind or bottom. In its use, to have sitzfleisch means the ability to sit still for long periods of time to be productive, a certain stamina at work and in life working through a situation or bringing a project to an end. Wawra's works are a play on endurance, staying power as well as sitting and flesh; with an autobiographical and associative approach. This is translated into different forms of expression: her characteristic layered mixed media pieces as well as drawings, oil painting, ceramics and sculpture.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Interlocked, Annika Berglund's solo show at Olivier Cornet Gallery

    14 Nov 2021 – 11 Dec 2021

    The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to present this solo show by gallery artist Annika Berglund. 'Interlocked' Within the last year and a half, Covid has changed many aspects of our lives. Most of us retreated into the safety of the domestic space except for those whose essential occupations meant they had to risk venturing out in society. The world seemed to shrink to fit inside square walls. It consisted of the circles we walked inside these walls and the bubbles we embraced. The connections to the world outside the squares and circles felt both much more tenuous and infinitely more important as the barriers to physical encounters grew. Life had to continue inside these confines. In our minds and in the virtual world we reached out to connect with a whole new urgency. Creativity and making became more complicated, impossible for some art forms, but bringing forth innovation and change in many instances. "This new reality led me to focus my practice on the immediate and the simple; the square I felt confined, but also protected me, the circle - the nurturing bubble, but also the sinister round spiky shape of the Coronavirus. Before the pandemic I had already been looking at a shift in materials from clay, glass and bronze to less energy hungry ways of expression. Textiles and fibre arts worked well in that context and proved to work much better in my new, more confined creative space. My work has always been informed by the character of different materials and in a dialog with their specific possibilities and constraints. Working with felt and mulberry paper turned out to be well suited for making in the domestic setting, but also appealed to me due to the symbology of how these materials come together. In creating this new series, fluffy wisps of wool and soft sheets of Mulberry paper are put together loosely, wetted down with soapy water and agitated to create a very strong fabric of interlocked fibres. The mulberry and wool fibres, through soap, water, rubbing and being knocked around, create connections that hold them together so tightly they can no longer be pulled apart and they become a unified whole. Cohesion through adversity if you will..." Please note that the exhibition will also feature the artist's Corona piece 'In Danger? Who?' which was recently acquired by the National Museum of Ireland for their Covid-related collection. The artist and the gallery would like to thank the National Museum of Ireland for allowing us to include this work in the show. Launch of the show: - At the gallery, Sunday 14 November, 2:00-6:00pm in the presence of the artist (Please book a time that suits you by calling/texting or emailing us) - Here on line in this 3D Virtual Space, Sunday 14 November from 12 noon onwards. Availability of the show: - Tuesdays to Sundays at the gallery from 16 November to 11 December (please book a time). - Here on line in this 3D Virtual Space from Sunday 14 November onwards. Please note that the dimensions of the works should always be read as height x width x depth (despite the erroneous syntax given within brackets).

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    FIELD OF VISION, botanical treasures in focus, a solo show by YANNY PETTERS

    10 Oct 2021 – 06 Nov 2021

    The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to present this solo show by gallery artist Yanny Petters. 'Field of Vision', botanical treasures in focus "When I was a child, my brother and I were given a microscope by my parents. I was fascinated by the detail of tiny objects we looked at, a view of the minutiae that makes up our surroundings. Things we examined included petals, leaf cells and seeds, shining a light on their structure and intense colours. I was also curious about the tiny glass slides, the design of the instrument and how the scientific process of examination worked. Looking back, this instrument, along with my parents' encouragement, was an important part of what sparked my curiosity in plants and opened my eyes to a botanical field of vision. Little did I know that years later I would be inspired by this childhood memory. For almost two years we have had to look at our surroundings in a new way, our field of vision being reduced due to the world wide Covid-19 pandemic. Through my love of Irish wild plants I often gather drawings for my work from far afield, but this time I have seized upon this opportunity to explore those wild plants that are closest to me in my garden. When we look at our immediate surroundings we don't have to go far to find wonderful and fascinating habitats, delicate ecosystems which sustain life. 'Plant blindness' is a term used since the 1990s to describe the lack of human awareness of plants. Our increased urbanisation has reduced our contact with nature, thereby separating us from the very elements we need for our survival in a time of climate change. Through my exhibition I continue to raise awareness of our botanical cohabitants, some of which we need for food and medicine, and all of which form a valuable symbiotic relationship between each other, pollinator insects, birds, animals and ourselves." The exhibition includes 75 small Verre Eglomisé paintings proportionally similar in shape to glass slides used in the old microscope. Each plant is drawn from nature, a selection from the myriad wild plants growing on about half an acre, native plants which all too often go un-noticed, but which are part of delicate and precious habitats. They include Spring flowers like Celandine, Primrose and Cowslip, Summer flowers from Bluebell, Foxglove and Poppy to Forget-me-not and Clover as well as Autumnal favourites like Bramble, Rowan and Hawthorn. Each painting is 21cm x 8.5cm on 4mm glass and involves acid etching, drawing, painting and gilding in the technique of Verre Eglomisé. The back of each panel is gilded to cast a glow behind the plant, emphasising its preciousness, making that which is considered common more exquisite. The paintings are presented in groups of three reflecting the season, their habitat or their relationship with each other, capturing their delightful vivacity. The exhibition runs at the gallery until 6 November 2021. Note: The small paintings, presented in a group of 3, are mounted on wood brackets which allow the paintings to cast beautiful shadows once hung on the wall. We recommend a visit to the gallery to see the mesmerizing interplay between all these elements. The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to share the news that in recent months, work by the artist has joined two important public collections: 'The Plants We Played With', now part of the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin 'Hand fan for habitats', now part of the collection of the National Museum of Ireland, Dublin. We are also delighted to announce that two works from this exhibition have been acquired by Dr Shirley Sherwood for the Shirley Sherwood Collection (Gallery of Botanical Art, Kew, London). Please note that the dimensions of the works should always be read as height x width x depth (despite the erroneous syntax given within brackets).

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    ALTER / ALTAR by Aisling Conroy

    12 Sep 2021 – 02 Oct 2021

    The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to present this solo show by the artist Aisling Conroy, a member of our AGA group. 'ALTER / ALTAR' ALTER / ALTAR is Conroy's response to the current climate of transition, universal unrest and shift in the collective consciousness. In this new work, the artist attempts to create types of multi-hyphenated worlds that glean and appropriate ideas from her ongoing interest in Eastern and Western philosophies. Conroy seeks to compare these multihyphenates to the new multi-hyphenated ways in which we now live, taking on numerous roles and titles often necessary to survive and advance. These new ways can often create chaos, fragmentation and even darkness before they manifest into something more transformative. There is a symbiosis happening here: when one 'alters' or changes, one also needs to purge and offer up an old part of themselves (altar). Conroy incorporates several motifs of various doctrines and philosophies (i.e. Zen Buddhism, Tantric Hinduism, Shamanism, the Occult) to simulate these shifts. The artist's process is intuitive, repetitive and ritualistic, constructing paintings that could be interpreted as a type of incantation to past lives and new beginnings. The show will run until 02 October 2021. "In this new series of paintings and prints, Conroy moves through an exploration of form and colour as it pertains to the processes of painting and print making. With her recent award-winning short film Bardo providing a counterpoint to investigate illustrative representation and the work within Alter/Altar considering recurrent abstract motifs in her own work, she seeks out a language of form. In these compositions she often disregards responsibility towards practical function and instead depicts structures that spring forth as manifestations of ideas that take place intuitively, leaving space open for unpredictability and imagination. These paintings and prints incorporate references from previous works that have been deconstructed, allowing them to become part of a new piece. This process of construction and deconstruction is one of the defining factors of Conroy’s practice as fragments within the work are granted a cyclical function and so take on a symbolic meaning within each new series. Recurring motifs and gestures are applied and their reiteration demonstrates a pictorial conversation, where none are sovereign, but each are dependent on their relation to each other. References to the dialectic of conscious and subconscious, inside and outside are ubiquitous and thus evoke the work of Henri Michaux, particularly Miserable Miracle (1956) as a poetic example of this dynamic, Michaux (1899 – 1984) was a Belgian-born poet, writer, and painter who wrote in French. ‘Among silent breakers, the tremors of the shining surface, in the swift flux and reflux martyrising the patches of light, in the rendings of luminous loops and arcs, and lines, in the occultations and reappearances of dancing bursts of light being decomposed, recomposed, contracted, spread out, only to be re-distributed once more before me, with me, within me, drowned, and unendurably buffeted, my calm violated a thousand times by the tongues of infinity, oscillating, sinusoidally overrun by the multitude of liquid lines. Enormous with a thousand folds, I was and I was not, I was caught, I was lost, I was in a state of complete ubiquity. The thousands upon thousands of rustlings were my own thousand shatterings’. Henri Michaux’s writings have a tendency to aggravate the line of demarcation between outside and inside in his struggle to resolve his inner understanding of the world with his outer participation in it. This is a sentiment echoed in Aisling Conroy’s work whose compositions conjure a structurally evolving internal landscape that acts as a vessel for memories and meditations. Her idiosyncratic compositions simultaneously evoke a sacred geometry as well as signs and symbols of the occult, spurring reflection on dichotomies such as absence and presence, fragment and whole and Eastern and Western Philosophies. In a series of works that often relate to each other, there is a development of terrains, landscapes, archipelagos and cosmic phenomenon like lunar eclipses and constellations. In many of the works we see a sphere or black void, eluding to the Shiva Lingam painting tradition in India, images which functioned as Hindu meditation aids in which each of the symbols had a purpose in their making. The focal point of these paintings is often a black sphere or lozenge shape at the centre to represent the cosmos or potentially the womb and the purpose of these paintings is the visualisation of shared symbols. Embedded in Conroy’s practice is her admiration for pioneers of 19th Century abstract art like Swedish artist and mystic, Hilma af Klint (1862 –1944) and Russian painter and art theorist, Wassily Kandinsky (1866 –1944). Consequently the work is given an art historical context that relates to developments in the medium of paint at a time when such artists were coming to terms with the diminishing emphasis or relevance of representation in painting. Both of these artists were also concerned with the Spiritual in art; how the elusive and the intangible might find visual expression. Within Alter/Altar Aisling Conroy explores the boundaries between painting, print and her previous works in animation with a broad and experienced understanding of each process. In her work, we often witness the pictorial plane, fragmenting and compartmentalising; distilled into abstract forms. They appear as signs and symbols that might be read as part of the lexicon of an esoteric visual language and the purpose of such a lexicon is to deceive the senses and present us with a phantom world. In many ways, her work is concerned with how we represent thoughts, ruminations and dreams and she seeks out common signifiers of these thoughts as they might occur in the collective conscious." - Ingrid Lyons

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Less Jam, More Havoc, an exhibition by Kelly Ratchford and Jaki Coffey

    15 Jul 2021 – 15 Aug 2021

    The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to present this two-person exhibition featuring new work by Jaki Coffey and Olivier Cornet Gallery artist Kelly Ratchford. We’ve all been climbing the walls during these bizarre times. Sometimes walls can be useful collateral. After a very successful run of ‘Jam Havoc’ in our 3D Virtual Space in March/April, Jaki Coffey and Kelly Ratchford are exhibiting new work for ‘Less Jam, More Havoc’ at the Olivier Cornet Gallery. Jaki Coffey creates playful pieces that celebrate personal narratives with careful consideration to the materials used. The work in this exhibition is a record of the artist’s daughter attacking glorious blocks of butter while quietly leaving her marks as ephemeral graffiti around the home. Mark making is also a significant aspect to Kelly Ratchford’s practice. Simple lines and sporadic blocks of colour offer a simplicity found in work made by children. The simplicity is working in conjunction with a complex layer of mistakes, spills and messes. Both artists share a desire to incorporate humour and playfulness in their work. They take the work seriously but delight in the spontaneous, in the play. During their earlier online exhibition, the artists enjoyed a question-and-answer talk with children and young people from different parts of the world. The artists have invited some of the participants to make and share something inspired by the earlier show. These masterpieces will also be exhibited in ‘Less Jam, More Havoc'. Note about The Gary Numan's (3D vehicles) series: sizes are variable, they range from 7x6x1cm for the smallest (75 euro each) to 12x10x2cm for the largest ones (85 euro each). Contact us for details.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    "Hold to the now, the here, through which all future plunges to the past". A look at the last 5 years of Bloomsday exhibitions at the OCG.

    16 Jun 2021 – 16 Jun 2022

    "Hold to the now, the here, through which all future plunges to the past" Bloomsday is an annual event and the name of a festival held in Dublin (Ireland), in various countries in Europe and around the world. It celebrates Thursday, the 16th of June 1904, the day depicted in Ulysses, James Joyce’s famous novel. The day is named after the central character in the novel, namely Leopold Bloom. James Joyce's book, published by Sylvia Beach in Paris in 1922, chronicles the life and encounters of Leopold Bloom with other real and fictional characters in and around Dublin. The annual Bloomsday Festival occupies an important part in the life of the Olivier Cornet Gallery. We are fortunate to have been part of the festival for a good few years now. This year for Bloomsday, through our 3D Virtual Space, the Olivier Cornet Gallery is taking a look at the last 5 years of Bloomsday exhibitions at our premises. We are delighted to present a selection of works from “Portrait of Gerald Davis as an Artist” (2016), “There's a touch of the artist about old Bloom (2017)” , “Drawing on Joyce (2018)”, “Olives, Oysters and Oranges (2019)” and “The Morphing Feminine” (2020), all part of the annual Bloomsday Festival. This online exhibition features previously exhibited work by Mary A. Fitzgerald, Michelle Boyle, Aisling Conroy, Gerald Davis, Áine Divine, David Fox, Nickie Hayden, John Keating, Eoin Mac Lochlainn, Maser, Miriam McConnon, Paula Meehan, Yanny Petters, Kelly Ratchford, Robert Russell, Vicky Smith and Susanne Wawra with a special mention of: - the wonderful collaboration with Dublin Sketchers -through examples of work by Marie-Hélène Brohan Delhaye, Alice Campbell, Leyho and Nina Ruminska. - the essential support by past and present managers of The James Joyce Centre Dublin -Mark Traynor, Jessica Peel-Yates and Darina Gallagher. - performers such as Caitríona Ní Threasaigh. and last but not least - support from Joycean experts such as David Norris, Dr Flicka Small and Dr Caroline Elbay. When you visit the show in our virtual space, make sure you click on the information (i) button across the image to display more context about the work and find out more about the original exhibition it was part of.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Displaced Privilege by Miriam McConnon

    23 May 2021 – 30 Jun 2021

    Miriam McConnon has worked with families who have been recently or in the past been displaced because of war. Her work in concerned with excavating the personal experience of displacement from the collective stories. In this new work, she looks at the opposing narratives of the refugee and the non-refugee. The work incorporates personal objects from the refugee’s migratory journey. These visual testimonies expose a commonality between the current global restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic and the constant reality for those displaced by conflict. In the ‘No More Time’ series, McConnon integrates elements of childhood with imagery from the narrative of war. She presents an empty school desk in front of a blackboard covered in a Syrian child’s drawing of home, a wall of redundant vanity cases and rows of stacked red school chairs. Another painting portrays oversized Lego bricks scattered in a bombed-out building. This series exposes the role that privilege plays in the global pandemic, acknowledging the contrast between the interruption of childhood due to this pandemic and the loss of childhood due to war. The repetition of the tales of conflict and displacement throughout history leaves the personal narrative endangered. McConnon relates Cypriot and Syrian stories of displacement in her paintings, depicting these similar narratives that were decades apart through patterns of traditional weave and lace. She employs objects to construct new objects, reimagining them as objects anchored to ideas of conflict and home. By altering the identity of an object, McConnon aims to alter perceptions. Passports become tents in a refugee camp, the ammunition from a child’s toy gun become flowers, an infant bracelet takes on the form of a tank and envelopes become homes. The envelope is an object that easily crosses borders. In ‘Envelope Homes, the artist makes the envelope a settled entity and a symbol of home. During the pandemic, our homes became our safe houses and our quarantine. But for a large population of the world, the idea of a safe place to call home is non-existent. This show serves as a reminder that the freedom of movement, access to medicine and education are indeed a privilege.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Is glas iad na cnoic, a solo show by Eoin Mac Lochlainn

    18 Apr 2021 – 19 May 2021

    The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to present this solo show by gallery artist Eoin Mac Lochlainn Is glas iad na cnoic "This series of multi-faceted paintings celebrates the everyday wonders of the living planet although feelings of anxiety, grief and loneliness are never far from the surface. The title of the series comes from the Irish proverb: the faraway hills are green, a reminder that what we have is already enough. Perhaps being confined during lockdown made us grateful for little things - like the singing of the blackbird or the reappearance of primroses - but for me, it also highlighted the precarious nature of the world we live in. Mahatma Gandhi once wrote that there is enough on the planet for man’s need but not enough for man’s greed. What do we actually need? How much is enough? As the period of lockdown has shown, many of us can make do with a lot less than we had become accustomed to - but what about the arts? What about beauty? Can we do without beauty in our lives? We don’t have to. We have an awareness of beauty in our minds. We all have memories of different times and different places that we cherish. It was my memories that sustained me during these difficult times and inspired my new work. The work has taken the form of windows, windows to worlds far away and out of reach. It was created incrementally, starting as daily sketches and small exercises in the studio, gradually coming together in larger compositions that were simultaneously figurative and abstract." Eoin Mac Lochlainn Please note that the online exhibition and catalogue also show/include details of some of the paintings. These are marked as 'detail' in their description and are not available separately.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Jam Havoc

    14 Mar 2021 – 11 Apr 2021

    Jam havoc is a two-person exhibition featuring new work by guest artist Jaki Coffey and Olivier Cornet Gallery artist Kelly Ratchford. "Coffey creates playful pieces that celebrate personal narratives with careful consideration to the materials used. The work in this exhibition is a record of the artist’s daughter attacking glorious blocks of butter while quietly leaving her marks as ephemeral graffiti around the home. Mark making is also a significant aspect to Ratchford’s paintings. Simple lines and sporadic blocks of colour offer a simplicity found in work made by children. The simplicity is working in conjunction with a complex layer of mistakes, spills and messes. Both artists share a desire to incorporate humour and playfulness in their work. They take the work seriously but delight in the spontaneous, in the play. We’ve all been climbing the walls during these bizarre times. Sometimes walls can be useful collateral." ------------------------- Note about Jaki Coffey's 'Butter Pat' works: A silver or gilding metal brooch can be added to any Butter Pat work, see the Butterfingers series in the exhibition for prices.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    On Paper

    20 Dec 2020 – 14 Feb 2021

    Group show curated in collaboration with Jackie Ryan Artists: Annika Berglund, Aisling Conroy, Hugh Cummins, Mary A. Fitzgerald, John Fitzsimons, Jordi Forniés, Conrad Frankel, David Fox, Claire Halpin, Nickie Hayden, Eoin Mac Lochlainn, Miriam McConnon, Sheila Naughton, Yanny Petters, Kelly Ratchford, Vicky Smith and Susanne Wawra Jackie Ryan has also selected work by the following artists for this special exhibition: William Crozier, Paul Furneaux, John Keating, Harry Kernoff, Eamonn O'Doherty and Barbara Rae. Launch of the show: Sunday 20 December, 12 noon to 5pm at the Olivier Cornet Gallery. Please book a time that suits you by calling/texting or emailing us. Availability of the show: Tuesdays to Sundays at the gallery. The Olivier Cornet Gallery is delighted to present this group exhibition curated with art consultant and producer Jackie Ryan. Jackie Ryan has just celebrated 21 years of collaboration with Irish artists on projects, commissions, and exhibitions in Ireland and around the world. We are delighted to have invited her to co-curate this exhibition of works on paper for our winter show. "Fragility, Endurance, Resilience Art on paper is one of the oldest art forms, and yet still considered by many to be fragile or ephemeral. Museums happily display three dimensional sculpture and oil paintings in the assurance that their condition will not deteriorate through the museum atmosphere or light. The irony is that many museums largest collections are works on paper, which are preciously stored away without engagement with the public. The growth of digital engagement with art is changing that. Covid-19 is changing that. Our world and the way we appreciate works on paper will be very different in 2021 and beyond. I began to discuss my love of works on paper, and the beauty of fine art print, with gallery owner Olivier Cornet long before Covid-19 appeared in our lives. However, we did debate audience engagement with art online, and breaking down many long held stereotypes that somehow art was less tangible if seen through a screen. We use the phrase regularly about looking at art ‘in the flesh’ up close and personal, without really thinking about why we are giving that more importance than physically being with the artifact. The past 8 months has seen the Olivier Cornet Gallery (OCG) alongside galleries worldwide embrace new ways we can engage with art through video clips of the process of art being made, through online viewing rooms and in the OCG’s case through their novel 3D Virtual Space. So much great art emerges from the fragility of change. In the months ahead Olivier and I will collate a collection of works on paper, works that can be shared up close and personal through digital means, and which embody the resilience that underpins so much art. We will look at the longevity of works on paper, and the endurance of colour using pigments bound with oil, and inks which have outlived so many modern art movements. In the months ahead, watch and wait. We will unfold works on paper for the world to enjoy in a virtual and physical engagement which will highlight fragility and uphold endurance, and champion resilience. After all, without resilience there would be no art." Jackie Ryan, 4 December 2020

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Sanctuary by Nickie Hayden

    08 Nov 2020 – 13 Dec 2020

    Sanctuary "My work brings together various elements within an exhibition space, creating a linked series of works using different media that invites the audience to interact and respond on an emotional level. I often invite other artists to respond and contribute elements to the exhibition that will further develop the narrative. This exhibition and installation is a response to a poem written by the American poet Peter Money, who was taught by Allen Ginsberg. I was introduced to Money while working towards a previous exhibition that was run in the James Joyce Centre. In Peter Money’s work, I found an echo of something that I was very familiar with. The poem I am responding to is called ‘To The Lady in Pink Standing On Top The Bridge’. This poem describes a girl wearing a pink dress on Brooklyn Bridge. It looks as though she may jump from the bridge, and there is a person in a taxi watching this unfold. It is up to the reader to decide whether the girl decides to jump or not, and this forms the basis of the idea for my exhibition. In my interpretation she does not jump, and so the pink dress represents her sanctuary. It is this sanctuary, nourishment and inner strength that I have represented in this new body of work. There are several elements to this project. I have made a pink tent to echo the girl’s pink dress. The tent shape is geometric and strong, representing a safer and sturdier place for inner strength to evolve. The tent walls are made from Perspex filled with pink sea salt crystals, allowing the light to filter through. Crystals are known to represent grounding and strength and have a magical feel about them. I have attached collected poems within the tent on translucent paper that are in turn effected by the light. My aim is for this to feel incredibly peaceful to the audience. Poets Theo Dorgan, Rachael Hegarty, Catherine Ann Cullen and Paula Meehan have contributed poems for this that connect with the idea of sanctuary, and I have worked with the Saol Project, a woman’s group in Dublin’s inner city, and they have written and contributed Haiku to the project. Another part of the project is a Haiku wheel, an element that I have previously used in other projects. I have enlisted the help of Haiku expert Toyomi Iwawaki-Riebel, a lecturer of Japanese Studies at the University of Erlangen-Nurnberg. She has collected Haiku from poets and philosophers from all over the world. These collected Haiku have also been inspired by Money’s poem and they introduce a different perspective to the project." Nickie Hayden Hayden has been a practicing artist for over 30 years. She was a director in the Black Church Print Studio and Graphic Print Studio Dublin. She was also on the steering committee of two major exhibitions, ‘Revelations’ in the National Gallery, and ‘Artist Proof’ in the Chester Beatty Library. Hayden’s materials are intrinsic to her practice. She works in oil and acrylic painting, sculpture, mixed media and installation. Some of her work has been highly interactive. Some of the artist's work has been highly interactive. Hayden has worked with community and literacy groups, such as the SAOL Project and Career Paths for Adult Dyslexics, in various exhibitions. Hayden’s most recent exhibition was the ‘Ulysses Haiku Project’ in The James Joyce Centre. She invited a number of poets including Theo Dorgan, Paula Meehan, Patricia Ross, Rachel Hegarty and Stephen Fry to write Ulysses related Haiku. Hayden’s goal is to make art inclusive. She believes that art reaches the parts of us that are most sensitive- It can allow deep connections with the inner self and with those that we share the artistic exploration with. Her work is in many collections here in Ireland and abroad. Permanent collections include: The National Gallery of Ireland, Department of Foreign Affairs, National Irish Bank, Allied Irish Banks, Office of Public Works, Halford and Hutchinson Films, Informix Software, Intel Ireland Ltd, Mespil Hotel, The Rochestown Lodge, Tara Investment Ltd, Lorcan Lyons Associates, Citibank, Enterprise Trade, Cantrell and Crowley Architects, Robinson-O’Keefe-Devane Architects, St. Mary’s College Rathmines, Enterprise Ireland (Dublin, Zurich, Stokholm, Boston and Dusseldorf), The Ark, Dubln.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Time and Space, a solo show by John Fitzsimons

    07 Sep 2020 – 07 Oct 2020

    The Olivier Cornet is delighted to present Time and Space A solo exhibition of new paintings by gallery artist John Fitzsimons. The exhibition runs at the gallery until 30th September. "Time and Space is an exhibition of new paintings by John Fitzsimons. The works in this exhibition use the infinite possibilities of colour, line and shape to explore the endlessness and expansiveness of time. At the heart of this exhibition, Fitzsimons presents a new series of paintings formed using quadrilateral motifs. Each painting presents four, four-sided shapes side by side, each softly modified through form and colour – the tilt of a line from left to right, the deepening of a hue. These works are generated within a series of set rules devised by the artist – the ends of each quadrilateral can be either perpendicular or slope left or right – but even when working within this fixed set of parameters, the number of possible paintings this format could generate grows exponentially when adding variable factors such as colour. Those manifested thus represent only a select few of the possibilities – just as we are inhabiting just a minute section of the infinite cosmic sprawl of time, and perhaps occupy just one of many possible parallel universes. Across other works in the exhibition, Fitzsimons deepens this exploration into the cosmic realm, further fragmenting his angular geometric forms to create layered, optically complex paintings. Rectangles and rhomboids softly glimmer in and out of focus in an array of muted hues in one work, evoking the flickering of a light. Other paintings feel more radical, more charged, in their depiction of spacetime: light speed is rendered as linear shapes zooming upwards, while wiry trapezoid forms seem to radiate outwards from their angular source in another painting, crystallising the notion of multiple universes operating in tandem. Devised in electric colour palettes, the works vary from rhythmic and modular, to pulsating with a newfound sense of dynamism. The paint itself is applied in thin layers, minimising the artist's hand, and creating a smoother, more hard-edged spirit. That said, a newfound depth has been created in some of the works, which use glazing techniques to achieve a rich, velvety texture. The dynamic potential of the paintings is further heightened by the application of paint to the sides of the canvasses, adding a three-dimensionality and sculptural quality to the works." Rosa Abbott

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Covid Eyes, an online project by Eoin Mac Lochlainn

    11 Oct 2020 – 30 Oct 2020

    COVID EYES An online art project funded by the Arts Council of Ireland Eoin Mac Lochlainn's painting practice has been an ongoing response to stories in the media, be it climate change, homelessness or the Irish Diaspora. During the Covid-19 pandemic, this strange period of isolation, social distancing and face masks, the artist became acutely aware of the special significance of human eyes. "The eyes can tell so much about us, our fear, our frustrations, our compassion, but at the same time, the masks can hide so much. It can be more difficult to ascertain age, social standing, emotions etc. For my project in my online blog, I posted a new image of eyes every Tuesday over the summer of 2020. The project is permanently hosted on Scéalta Ealaíne, but these 'Covid Eyes' can now be seen here in the Olivier Cornet Gallery virtual space. The show running at the Olivier Cornet Gallery from October 11 to October 25, presents most of those paintings once again and it is hoped that visitors will appreciate the physicality of the works, the varying sizes and different media that were used in their creation. This exploration of eyes ultimately points to the fact that we are not that different from each other, that we are all in this together and that we must rely on each other to get through this. Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireann na daoine" Eoin Mac Lochlainn

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    Resurfacing

    06 Aug 2020 – 28 Aug 2020

    A group show curated in collaboration with gallery volunteers Maïté Moloney and Molliemia Murphy Following the social restrictions previously imposed by the state, the country is now reopening allowing many of us to go back to work or visit our friends and family again. Taking inspiration from these circumstances, we are 'resurfacing' pre-exhibited work by our artists, allowing us to give them a new lease of life, revisit them and think about our shared experience resurfacing. The exhibition features work by all our gallery artists, namely Annika Berglund, Hugh Cummins, John Fitzsimons, Jordi Forniés, Conrad Frankel, Claire Halpin, Eoin Mac Lochlainn, Miriam McConnon, Yanny Petters and Kelly Ratchford, as well as work by our Associate Gallery Artists (AGA group members): Aisling Conroy, Mary A. Fitzgerald, David Fox, Nickie Hayden, Sheila Naughton, Vicky Smith and Susanne Wawra. Last but not least, the exhibition also features work by Mark Newman, jewellery and metal work graduate, one of the 5 winners of the 2020 RDS Craft Awards. A special new work by gallery artist Yanny Petters, 'Calla Lily Blue', is also included in the exhibition as part of our celebration of National Heritage Week (15-23 August). Just a reminder that, during Covid-19, visits to the Olivier Cornet Gallery are by appointment and that face protection is required. Call/text us or email us to let us know what time would suit you. Thank you.

  • Olivier Cornet Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

    The Morphing Feminine

    16 Jun 2020 – 30 Jul 2020

    A Bloomsday 2020 group exhibition featuring new work by gallery artists Miriam McConnon and Kelly Ratchford and AGA group members Aisling Conroy, Mary A. Fitzgerald, David Fox, Nickie Hayden, Vicky Smith and Susanne Wawra. The exhibition is a visual artists's response / reaction to -and possibly a re-reading of- various aspects of the feminine in James Joyce's novel Ulysses and in the life of the author.

    latest works

    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday moments; red, 2021
      49 x 60 cm (h x w)
      hand dyed merino, viscose and silk
      € 950
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday patterns II, 2021
      20.5 x 20.5 cm (h x w)
      Merino, silk and viscose
      € 200
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday patterns I, 2021
      20.5 x 20.5 cm (h x w)
      Merino, silk and viscose
      € 200
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday patterns V, 2021
      20.5 x 20.5 cm (h x w)
      Merino, silk and viscose
      € 200
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday patterns IV, 2021
      20.5 x 20.5 cm (h x w)
      Merino, silk and viscose
      € 200
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday patterns III, 2021
      20.5 x 20.5 cm (h x w)
      Merino, silk and viscose
      € 200
    • Annika Berglund

      A Time of Bubbles I, 2021
      23 x 32 cm (h x w)
      mulberry paper, felted using the traditional Korean method of Joomchi
      € 280
    • Annika Berglund

      A Time of Bubbles II, 2021
      23 x 32 cm (h x w)
      mulberry paper, felted using the traditional Korean method of Joomchi
      € 280
    • Annika Berglund

      Quiet moments II, 2021
      15 x 40 cm (h x w)
      Merino, silk and Dorset
      € 290
    • Annika Berglund

      Quiet moments I, 2021
      15 x 40 cm (h x w)
      local breed : Dorset, Merino, silk and viscose
      € 290
    • Annika Berglund

      Domestic Spaces II, 2021
      27 x 63 x 7.5 cm (h x w x d)
      wood, Merino, Silk, viscose
      € 350
    • Annika Berglund

      The circles we walk (part 3), 2021
      41.5 x 130 cm (h x w)
      merino and local breeds Kerry Hill, Romney, Dorset and Shetland
      € 3200
    • Annika Berglund

      The circles we walk (part 2), 2021
      41.5 x 130 cm (h x w)
      merino and local breeds Kerry Hill, Romney, Dorset and Shetland
      € 3200
    • Annika Berglund

      The circles we walk (part 1), 2021
      41.5 x 130 cm (h x w)
      merino and local breeds Kerry Hill, Romney, Dorset and Shetland
      € 3200
    • Annika Berglund

      A beach within 5km, 2021
      83 x 83 cm (h x w)
      hand dyed merino wool and local breed kerry hill
      € 1800
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday moments; gold, 2021
      58 x 69 cm (h x w)
      hand dyed merino, viscose and silk
      € 1200
    • Annika Berglund

      Everyday moments; green, 2021
      56 x 68 cm (h x w)
      hand dyed merino, viscose and silk
      € 1200
    • Annika Berglund

      Every day moments; blue, 2021
      56 x 67 cm (h x w)
      hand dyed merino, viscose and silk
      € 1200
    • Annika Berglund

      The patterns we make, 2021
      90 x 90 cm (h x w)
      mulberry paper, felted using the traditional Korean method of Joomchi, wood, Nails
      € 1500
    • Annika Berglund

      Domestic spaces I, 2021
      57 x 161 cm (h x w)
      hand dyed merino, local breed: Llewn cross
      € 3100
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