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Harvard University Asia-related Centers

Harvard University Asia-related Centers

3D exhibitions

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Harvard Asia Center Poster Art, 2010-2020

    28 Sep 2020 – 01 Mar 2021

    This exhibit features posters from 2010 to 2020 that were designed to promote Asia Center programs and events: lectures, co-sponsored panels, seminars, art exhibits, and films. The majority were created by Mary Burgess at Classic Graphx, Cambridge. Kelly Maccioli, former staff member of the Asia Center, designed the early posters. James Evans, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, also contributed. Many of the posters have taken on a life of their own, beyond the events they were spotlighting, and have become works of art in their own right. They not only highlight the vast variety of programs the Asia-related centers offer, but they do so in immensely creative, artistic, and unique ways.

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Dazibao Exhibition

    01 Aug 2017 – 30 Dec 2017

    Fifty years ago, China entered one of the darkest phases of its modern history, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, a period of terrible violence that scarred a generation of Chinese people. During the Cultural Revolution “big character posters” (dazibao 大字报) were large, hand-written signs pasted on walls throughout China. Their content criticized local officials, colleagues, teachers, bosses, co-workers, former friends—virtually no one was exempt—for a wide-range of supposed political transgressions in what often became a cycle of high-stakes political attacks and counter-attacks. Despite the important role dazibao played in the visual and political landscape of the Cultural Revolution – as well as the subsequent Democracy Wall movement – they were never intended to be permanent, and so the vast majority were destroyed or simply decayed. Many China scholars, even experts on the period, have never had the chance to view dazibao up close. The creation of huge numbers of dazibao at this particular moment in China’s history can also be understood as an aesthetic or artistic phenomenon. Though only a scintilla of these works survive, dazibao occupy an important position in Chinese art history. Their reflection of the previous artistic tradition and their continuing inspiration for contemporary artists makes them perhaps as valuable to the art historian as to the student of politics. The mission of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University is to advance scholarship in all fields of Chinese studies. We are ecumenical in our choice of subjects and approaches. Our faculty celebrate the impressive cultural accomplishments of China in past and present, explore the many challenges that China is facing today, and recognize China’s many successes. But we also do not shy away from less pleasant or more controversial topics. The 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution is an opportune moment to reflect on the history of the Cultural Revolution and think about the relationship between past, present and future. For a variety of reasons, however, the anniversary went almost completely unmentioned in China. This exhibition presents the first-ever exhibition of big character posters and woodblock prints from the Cultural Revolution in the United States, and the first time that these dazibao have been exhibited anywhere in the world. Whether one sees these big-character posters and woodblock prints primarily in aesthetic terms, or treats them as historic relics or as objects that provoke conversations about China’s complex relationship with the past, we think they are worthy subjects of research and analysis. The Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies is proud to serve as the host of this exhibition.

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Dazibao TEST

    08 Aug 2017 – 08 Dec 2017

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Mapping Asia

    15 Feb 2017 – 14 Apr 2017

    An Exhibition of Selected Maps from the Harvard University Collestions Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center with support from the Provostial Funds Committee, Office of the Dean of Arts and Humanities, and with special thanks to the Harvard Map Collection and the Harvard-Yenching Library.

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Shadows of Shangri La: Nepal in Photographs, 1975-2011; Photographs by Kevin Bubriski, Documentary Photographer

    22 May 2017 – 30 Sep 2017

    Kevin Bubriski was a 2010-2011 Robert Gardner Visiting Artist, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University. Exhibition curated by Bettina Burch Sponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology and the Harvard University Asia Center

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Magnificent Trees of Asia

    31 Jan 2018 – 07 Mar 2018

    The Asia-related centers at Harvard periodically spotlight some of the vast Asian resources at the University. Featured in this exhibit are a selection of photographs of trees in Asia by Ernest Henry Wilson from Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum Horticultural Library. Ernest Henry Wilson (1876-1930) was the furthest traveled of all the Arnold Arboretum’s plant explorers of the early twentieth century. From 1899 to 1930, he visited dozens of countries, collected thousands of plant specimens (cuttings and seeds), and took thousands of incredible photographs documenting trees and forests, landscapes, and ethnography which testify to his legacy. Wilson was born in Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire, England, on February 15, 1876, the eldest of seven children. He apprenticed at the nurseries of Messrs. Hewitt of Solihull, Warwickshire and in 1892 gained employment at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens as a gardener. He studied botany at the Birmingham Technical School in the evenings and joined the staff at the Royal Botanical Garden at Kew in 1897. Even at a young age, Wilson showed immense promise. After training at Veitch’s Coombe Wood Nursery in London, he traveled abroad in 1899 to begin a successful career collecting Asian plants, returning to England in 1902. His second trip to China for Veitch lasted from 1903 to 1906. Wilson’s third and fourth visits to China were sponsored by Charles S. Sargent, the director of the Arnold Arboretum. For three years beginning in 1907, Wilson traveled in China’s western Hubei and western Sichuan provinces, before returning to Boston in 1909. Wilson’s second Arboretum trip, which began in 1910, was to collect cones and conifer seeds in central and southwestern China. In 1914, Wilson traveled in Japan, focusing his attention on conifers, azaleas, and Japanese cherries. Beginning in 1917, he undertook a systematic survey of Korea, Japan, and Formosa (Taiwan), returning to Boston in 1919 with seeds, living plants, 30,000 herbarium specimens, and 700 photographs. His last trip, a tour of the gardens of the world, took place from 1920 to 1922. Wilson was a popular lecturer on the topics of his travels and horticulture. After Sargent’s death in 1927, he became “Keeper” of the Arnold Arboretum. Three years later, his career was cut short when he and his wife were tragically killed in an automobile accident. Ernest Henry Wilson’s photographs and biography can be found on the Arnold Arboretum’s website (www.arboretum.harvard.edu) along with those of other explorers to Asia and information on the Arboretum’s Asia Programs. Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Harvard China Fund, the Korea Institute, and the Reischauser Institute of Japanese Studies. Special thanks to the Arnold Arboretum Horticultural Library

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    ASIA INSECTA, An Exhibition of Photography by Nathan Vedal, Ph.D. ‘17, Summer 2017

    Insects have long played an important role in the cultural and literary history of East Asia. A frequently cited Chinese anecdote from the fifth century tells of a poor scholar who read books by the light of fireflies because he could not afford oil for a lamp. In late imperial times, katydids were common pets in literati households; they are also present on the Jadeite Cabbage, one of the prize pieces in the National Palace Museum in Taipei. In Edo Japan, insects could be found depicted in the painting of masters such as Mori Shunkei and Hokusai. Today insects maintain a unique prominence in Asian society. Stag beetles, such as the nokogiri kuwagata pictured in this exhibit, are popular pets in Japan, with shops in Tokyo specializing in their care. The centuries-old art of cricket fighting is still practiced in old streets of Beijing, while a spider-fighting competition has been held in Kagoshima for nearly 30 years. Organized excursions to view fireflies are commonly advertised throughout Taiwan and Japan, and a surge of interest in insect-viewing has led to the recent opening in Beijing of Asia’s largest butterfly garden. East Asia is also home to a phenomenal diversity of insect species. Its varied ecosystems and climates, in addition to substantial environmental protection efforts, make the region an entomologist’s paradise. Nevertheless, there exist many threatened species of insect, the continued survival of which is precarious. It is hoped that photographic records such as this can help preserve the memory for future generations of this precious moment of biodiversity. The photographer, Nathan Vedal, is a PhD graduate from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. During the 2016-17 academic year, he was a Graduate Student Associate at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. Nathan captured these photographs while conducting research in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Japan using a Nikon DSLR camera with Sigma macro lens. This exhibit is sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, and Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Life In Singapore: Views from Migrant Workers

    23 Jan 2020 – 20 Feb 2020

    This exhibition, organized by Yong Han Poh, College ’20, was displayed in the Asian Centers’ Lounge, CGIS South, from January 23 to February 20, 2020. It was sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Harvard University Asia Center, and the Mahindra Humanities Center. It was also supported by local migrant arts groups in Singapore, including the Migrant Workers Photography Festival and Migrant Writers of Singapore.

  • Harvard University Asia-related Centers

    Exhibition: Elegy to a Uyghur Dreamscape

    01 May 2020 – 01 Jun 2020

    قەسىدە: ئۇيغۇرنىڭ ئۇيقۇسىز چۈشلىرى 維吾爾夢境的挽歌 Photographs by Lisa Ross Sponsored by: Committee on Inner Asia and Altaic Studies Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies Harvard University Asia Center with support from the Provostial Fund Committee, Office of the Dean of Arts and Humanities Exhibition curated by Lisa Ross, Holly Angell, and James Evans

    latest works

    • The payroll section

      Secretary Guo Seeks Privileges, 1966
      150 x 180 cm (h x w)
    • The Huaguang Factory is overlaid with white terror, oppressing and suffocating the old rebel faction
      180 x 120 cm (h x w)
    • Zhang --

      Thoroughly down with Chen --, the reactionary who has sneaked into the Party, 1966
      150 x 170 cm (h x w)
    • Thoroughly wipe out the poisonous weeds
      210 x 70 cm (h x w)
    • Look at the Wicked Face of Hong --!
      200 x 75 cm (h x w)
    • 2011. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2010. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2010. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2011. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2012. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2012. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2012. Kelly Maccioli, freelance graphic designer; former staff member of the Harvard Asia Center.
    • 2013. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
    • 2013. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
    • 2014. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
    • 2014. Center for the Study of World Religions
    • 2014. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
    • 2015. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
    • 2015. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
    • 2015. Mary Burgess, Classic Graphx, Cambridge.
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