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Jean-Luc Richard

Richard

Richard

Richard

The contemporary art gallery opened in 1989 in Paris and in 2011 in New York City, NY, USA. International contemporary art by emerging, mid-career, and established selected artists.


74, rue de Turenne 75003 Paris, France
121 Orchard Street, New York, NY 10002. USA

3D exhibitions

  • Richard

    Abstraction / Figuration

    14 Nov 2020 – 14 Nov 2023

    A selection of two paintings and three sculptures by nine international artists.

  • Richard

    Christophe AVELLA-BAGUR: Les Pleureuses

    24 Oct 2020 – 09 Jan 2021

    The seventeenth solo exhibition of Christophe Avella Bagur at Galerie Richard entitled «Les Pleureuses» from October 24 to December 2, 2020 consists of sixteen works in Indian ink on paper made during the coronavirus epidemic in 2020. On a recent video the artist presents his new work: “The Mourners series, which is part of the FS Face Series, Floating Souls, is a series on Chinese ink paper only, of large sizes ranging from two meters by three meters to fifty by sixty-five centimeters, where women, these weeping women will not only cry, most of them do not cry; it will be the paint that will cry, the paint that will gush out by water, by brushstrokes, with a saving of means. I chose the Chinese ink because it’s black and white worked in washes with a kind, not stratifications like in oil paint, but transparencies...” Because Christophe Avella Bagur was from the beginning part of the line of the great painters who mark their time, he continues the revival of figurative painting by treating almost exclusively a subject: the human being. Here he abandons the problem of transplanting human souls into standardized bodies and returns to very real, isolated people with their irreducible singularity he oxymorical opposition between the fragility suggested by the softness of the transparencies of fluid and light matter of the Indian ink in wash, and the strength rendered by the powerful contrast in the absolute black of the Indian ink and the white of the paper, accurately express the complexity of human nature. Christophe Avella-Bagur was born in Avignon in 1968. He obtained a DEA in Plastic Arts at the University Panthéon Sorbonne, Paris in 1992. He has exhibited at Galerie Richard since 1992. He regularly exhibits in Paris, New York, Belgium, China His works are in the collections of the Museum of New Art, Detroit, Michigan, USA, the National Museum of Shi Jia Zhuan, China, the Borusan Art and Culture Center, Istanbul, Turkey, the Colas Foundation, Boulogne-Billancourt, the Collection of the Villa Tamaris Art Center, La Seyne-sur-Mer, the Town Hall of Grande-Synthe, Grande-Synthe…

  • Richard

    Joseph Nechvatal: informed Men

    Galerie Richard announces the opening of Informed Men, a virtual solo exhibition of eight artworks from Joseph Nechvatal’s Informed Man series (1986-1990). Informed Men exhibits six large and two small paintings from this mid-1980s pioneering series that bought early digital technology and advanced conceptually-based painting together under a theme of information overload. About them, the artist wrote (in a 2017 artist statement) that these paintings are the results of recovered digital files (maquettes) of un-realized computer-robotic assisted paintings from his Informed Man series (1986-1990) that featured an information-saturated figure of Lazarus returning from the dead out of the tomb. And that this work stresses a continuum of artistic acts based on recovering from loss and the resisting of oblivion. Historic Background: The painting Informed Man (1986) 82x116” was one of the first large computer-robotic assisted acrylic digital paintings that Joseph Nechvatal created on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. It was first exhibited in Nechvatal’s solo exhibition at Brooke Alexander Gallery in SoHo in 1985 and purchased by Elaine Dannheisser there. The Dannheisser Foundation lent Informed Man to be exhibited in Documenta 8 in Kassel Germany in 1987. It is now in the collection of Emmanuel Javogue in Miami.

  • Richard

    Dennis HOLLINGSWORTH: Prado, Post Prado - The Complete Series

    The newest paintings by Dennis Hollingsworth come as a surprise as he established his recognition for expressing the potentialities of painting in color and space with an exuberant baroque spirit. The exhibition Prado, Post-Prado at Richard New York presents monochromatic restrained paintings which are probably the artist's most intimate ones. For the first time, this show gathers all works from this series exhibited either in Paris or in New York. “In the Spring and early Fall of 2019, I painted a series of paintings which commemorated the fifty-year anniversary of the moment I decided to become an artist. In 1969, I was thirteen years old and my family was traveling to Australia via Europe, the Mideast, India, Thailand, and the Philippines. I was born in Madrid and although I am half Anglo and half Malaysian, Spain had always held my imagination in thrall. During that voyage, we lingered in Madrid and it was then that I had visited the Prado for the first time. Prior to that moment, I was already in love with art, copiously drawing, and copying from the illustrations of the history books that I could find. Finally, I could see the works that I had only known in reproduction. It was at that moment when I stood in front of Goya’s “Saturn Devouring his Children”, that I was subsumed in something like a mystical experience. This was the exact moment in which I had realized and determined my destiny. Approaching the works in commemoration, I wanted to simplify the palette of colors in order to make vivid the embodiment of the physical form of impasto paint that had animated my life project as a painter for the past 24 years. Painting in monochrome achieved this goal. Laying a thick bed of paint onto the surface of the canvas and moving my handmade tools into it became something more like drawing in paint. Of course, the subjects were selections from the Prado’s collection that I had remembered from that visit fifty years ago. For several years up until that point, I was relying on masking to increase the intensity of the form of physical paint that I was painting with. I wanted to dial down the reliance on masking but not eliminate it altogether. The solution at that time was to mask a framing fringe at the edges of the paintings. The undulations recalled for me the architectural classicism of the Prado, something like an entablature, a fine nod as far as I was concerned. While I felt that I could do these commemorative paintings for the remainder of my life, the limitations of the Prado’s finite collection and the problem of the maudlin inevitably would present itself. I felt compelled to simultaneously close out that project and extend it onwards. It was last summer when I was painting an element of that series, a black painting employing the subject of Ribera’s “Jacob’s Dream” that I was gifted with a germ of a realization of how this project could find its’ permutation. There, in that particular painting and subject, was a detail of vegetation that held out a tantalizing promise of how to continue on past the commemorative series. Later, another flash of intuition led me to alter the form of the usual rectilinear format of the canvas as a means of performing the framing function of the mask. I had concluded that the hexagon was the simplest extension beyond the rectangular format that holds a rich set of allusions, all good and fascinating. Color and Form. Color is both downplayed in interaction and celebrated solo. Using these means, the physical vocabulary set of forms that I have coined can take center stage. The form of the canvas, itself a sign, urging us to see painting anew. A spotlight of raking light on a solitary performer singing an aria. An echo of a moment a half-century ago.” The diversity of his painting practice is mirrored in the diversity of his experience. Born in Madrid, Spain, his childhood was spent in eleven locations around the world, including the Philippines, Panama, and Las Vegas. Once a sailor in the South Pacific and Indian Oceans, always an architect by way of his first degree, he is a graduate of the Claremont Graduate University in Southern California. His works are in the permanent collections of the MOCA Los Angeles, CA, The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, KS, The Akron Museum, Akron OH, The Akzo Nobel Collection, Amsterdam, Netherlands, The Colección Riera Roura, Barcelona, Spain. Dennis Hollingsworth lives and works in NYC and in Tossa de Mar, Spain’s Catalan, Costa Brava.

    latest works

    • Kiyoshi Nakagami

      Untitled, 2018
      194 x 130 cm (h x w)
      Acrylic, Chinese ink and mica on canvas
    • Kiyoshi Nakagami

      Untitled, 2020
      130 x 195 cm (h x w)
      Acrylic, Chinese ink, mica on canvas
    • Hervé Heuzé

      Le Chardonnet, 2004
      97 x 195 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Hervé Heuzé

      Mont-Blanc en noir et blanc (3), 2019
      130 x 162 cm (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Christophe Avella-Bagur

      Face FS 39 My Social Time, 2007
      160 x 170 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Christophe Avella-Bagur

      Jeune fille sure d'elle, 1998
      110 x 87.5 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Lauren Marsolier

      Two Roads (diptych), 2016
      101.6 x 254 cm (h x w)
      archival pigment print
    • Lauren Marsolier

      Plaza, 2016
      114.3 x 76.2 cm (h x w)
      archival pigment print
    • Scott ANDERSON

      Trapper John Doe, 2014
      127 x 101.6 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Scott ANDERSON

      The Cosmopolitan, 2013
      152.4 x 122 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Jeremy Thomas

      Till The Cows Come Home Blue, 2016
      135 x 40 x 40 cm (h x w x d)
      Forged mild steel, nail lacquer and urethane
    • Jeremy Thomas

      Swamped Green, 2016
      135 x 40 x 40 cm (h x w x d)
      Forged mild Steel and nail lacquer
    • Jeremy Thomas

      Tuty Fruity Blue, 2016
      135 x 40 x 40 cm (h x w x d)
      Forged mild Steel and nail lacquer
    • Dennis Hollingsworth

      The Reassuring Littoral, 2015
      150 x 120 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas over wood panel
    • Dennis Hollingsworth

      Meadow of San Isidro, 2009
      122 x 244 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas over wood panel
    • Kim Young-Hun

      p1908-Electronic Nostalgia, 2019
      152.5 x 152.5 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Sven-Ole Frahm

      #159 Untitled, 2013
      185 x 185 x 15 cm (h x w x d)
      Acrylic on canvas
    • David Ryan

      Suzy, 2009
      119.4 x 137.2 x 5.7 cm (h x w x d)
      Acrylic on mdf
    • David Ryan

      Slugworth's Sizzlers, 2009
      76.2 x 81.3 x 5.1 cm (h x w x d)
      Acrylic on mdf
    • Kim Young-Hun

      P1803-Electronic Nostalgia, 2018
      162 x 114 cm (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
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