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Turner Carroll Gallery

Turner Carroll Gallery

3D exhibitions

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Judy Chicago: Earth

    29 Apr 2020 – 12 Aug 2020

    Judy Chicago: Earth Judy Chicago, born in 1939, has devoted her life to equality and justice. Though she first came to be known as an artist activist fighting for equanimity for women in the art world, that is only one of several aspects of Chicago’s six-decade preoccupation with justice in her artworks. In addition to her iconic feminist projects such as "The Dinner Party" and "Birth Project," Chicago has tackled themes relating to human, environmental, and animal rights, as well. Chicago has bathed the landscape in nurturing colored "Atmospheres," and celebrated the Earth with pyrotechnic and firework performances since the late 1960s. Her massive "Purple Atmosphere" was first performed in Santa Barbara in 1969, and her "Bouquet for Belen" celebrated her 80th birthday in 2019. Upcoming pyrotechnic works are scheduled for Berlin and her retrospective at the de Young Museum in San Francisco next year. When Chicago first started her performative works like "Atmospheres" and "Women in Smoke," she was the only woman artists in the earth art genre. Art critics simply didn’t know what to make of her radically innovative works. Tragically, for years they dismissed it. As is sometimes the case with artists whose brilliance is years ahead of society’s ability to comprehend it, Chicago sought new materials such as photography, video and print, to reiterate her most important messages. Only now, fifty years later, is the gargantuan significance of her atmospheres and "Women and Smoke" works like those included in this exhibition and honoring the Earth, fully comprehensible. Chicago’s 1990s project titled "Resolutions: A Stitch in Time," her "Rainbow Warrior" poster for Greenpeace, her 2000s projects Kitty City and "The End: A Meditation on Death and Extinction," and her latest and largest collaborative project titled #CreateArtForEarth are all attempts to influence our civilization to embrace a more equitable future for human, animal, and planetary coexistence. Chicago’s artistic voice has at times been loud because it had to be to grab attention for urgent causes. Now her voice is the voice of wisdom gained from time on Earth and we need to seek it out. This exhibition offers us a chance to take in images from the whole span of Chicago’s vast career, and finally fully digest her overarching call for us to take care of all living beings, whether plant, animal, or human. Tonya Turner Carroll Santa Fe, New Mexico 2020

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Raphaëlle Goethals: The Memory of Persistence

    17 Jul 2020 – 06 Sep 2020

    “I was never interested in the entertainment, the theatrical, or political side of art. It is how art can deeply affect us emotionally that fascinates me.” Raphaelle Goethals’ practice comes from a desire for larger truths, a search for the timeless and the infinite, and a cultivation of both devotion and humanism. Through her process, she allows her psyche to drift into a deeply instinctual place where each body of work, each painting, and each mark or gesture advances from the one preceding, developing intuitively within a framework of layered content and coded vocabulary. “My internal language of mark-making evolved from my early interest in the semiotic, the study of signs and symbols and how we assign them meaning. This is where I am called to search for the sublime,” says Goethals. The evolution of this body of work led to several key developments. The conceptual exploration of transforming micro to macro and breaking away from the conventional rectilinear canvas is evident in one of the cornerstones of the exhibition: Séléné. The circular form, once only used by Goethals as an anchoring mechanism, has no beginning or end, no straight angle; it is the suggestion of space and our place in the cosmos. Séléné takes on this round format, a new direction for Goethals, one that allowed her to explore on a detailed level the same shape that she had previously used to create subtle grid structures within her paintings. Taking this form to the macro level allows the viewer to dive into a painting such as Séléné the same way we can allow our imagination to sink into infinite space itself. Two of the largest works in this series are profoundly immersive. Waimoku, inspired by the Waimoku Falls, a majestic waterfall situated at the head of Ohe’o Gulch in Maui, Hawaii, captures the atmospheric mist, cascading movement, and the raw force of nature in a freshly liberated, more painterly style. Eidolon is Goethals’ largest work to date, and was the initial painting that spurred this current direction. At nearly ten feet wide, this tour de force work, in an engulfing panorama, abundantly illustrates the artists mastery of composition and her recent aesthetic advancements. Raphaelle’s early influences originate not only from the devotional painting of Flemish Masters but also with painters such as Per Kirkeby and Lucian Freud. Post-minimalist artists like Eva Hesse and Wolfgang Laib also fed her creative impulse in their exploration of materials and forms, moving away from revealing the “hand” of the artist in the artwork. The Memory of Persistence reflects years of developing and perfecting Raphalle’s unique vision and history—a history that began for her as a bold, expressionist painter. It took decades for Goethals to distill and to circle back to embrace her beginnings as a painter of movement, space, and energy. This series presents a highly mature, more sensitive, and meaningful manifestation. IT captures the essence of swirling cosmic dust clouds in a feathery application layered over the previously tranquil, meditative surfaces. The result is a monumental advancement in composition, a richness of emotion, technique, and movement, where the viewer can effortlessly escape further into the depths of mystery and meaning in her works. To fully engage in the experience of these paintings asks the viewer for a suspension of time and a suspension of belief. And, while there is nothing representational or descriptive about the work, it unfailingly acts as a portal of exploration and a familiar reflection of ourselves, our stories, and our deepest questions of human existence.

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Solstice: Create Art For Earth ONLINE Exhibition

    20 Jun 2020 – 12 Aug 2020

    The “Solstice” exhibition showcases works by artists from Finland, Iran, Italy, Japan, and the U.S. through a diverse collection of environmentally-focused art that calls us to reflect upon our impact on the planet and consider a better way forward. The exhibition acts in tandem with the international #CreateArtforEarth initiative conceived by curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Jane Fonda, Judy Chicago, Green Peace, and Swoon to empower artists to speak through their work and spur global action. This online exhibition exists in conjunction with the gallery exhibition Solstice: Create Art For Earth, held onsite at Turner Carroll Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Both the gallery exhibition and the online exhibition were curated by Judy Chicago and Turner Carroll Gallery. We hope you enjoy the special audio attributes of this online exhibition, in which you'll hear the artists speak about their works and what inspires them, in their own voices. 10% of proceeds from sales of these artworks will benefit Judy Chicago's Through the Flower nonprofit, whose mission is to prevent erasure of women's achievements in history. Please contact us at info@turnercarrollgallery.com to acquire any of these artworks.

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Hunt Slonem: Fluffle

    15 May 2020 – 14 Jun 2020

    To refer to Hunt Slonem as a “rara avis” is just about perfect. He is a rare chap with a collection of historic buildings, and a studio occupied by himself and 60 birds. Grids and lines and squares fill Hunt’s world, surrounded as he is by cages and walls and windows. His work is not unlike an interior Agnes Martin inside a building; no unambiguous or stark outside desert, but wet paint on wet paint inspired by being private and inside one’s own home. Reiteration runs like a mantra through Hunt’s work. As in a prayer, the same words are uttered, but every time they are said the intention and meter are slightly different. As images, rabbits seem obvious as subject matter as we know them to multiply. A group of bunnies, known as a “fluffle,” find their way on to canvas. Quick and gestural, his rabbits are a sly nod to nature’s own direction to reproduce. Hunt’s birds are a more personal match for the act of repetition. He says they are obsessive like he is, and are celestial messengers in almost every faith. Birds chatter away, half-hidden but everywhere. Their obsession implying intention, just as the painter makes them real with color, and oil, and incised lines. Slonem is renowned for his distinct neo-expressionistic style, and his desire is that people have their own experiences with his work. The mechanism of painting, and the item that is a painting, is the magic to Hunt. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Fundació Joan Miró, Moscow Museum of Modern Art, and Istanbul Museum of Modern Art are among the prestigious museums worldwide that have shown Hunt Slonem’s work. Whether you choose one unique piece, a grouping, or a “fluffle” of works to hang salon-style, we are honored to present this curated selection of works for you to add to your collection!

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Lien Truong Selected Works

    27 Apr 2020 – 15 May 2020

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Judy Chicago: A Revolution in Print

    21 Apr 2020 – 31 Dec 2020

    In celebration of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation acquiring the print archive of Judy Chicago Turner Carroll presents “Judy Chicago: From the Print Archives,” a retrospective view of her six-decade career as a printmaker. Chicago’s artwork has pushed the boundaries of technology and subject matter, and her print archive and associated studies and process works represent her journey as a woman artist in an art world long dominated by male artists, curators, and critics. This body of work includes some of her most important images from The Birth Project, The Song of Songs, and her early Feminist works. Judy Chicago has always been on the forefront of printmaking both ideologically and technically. Turner Carroll will present talks and programming in various media throughout the run of this exhibition.

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Dallas Art Fair 2020

    13 Apr 2020 – 23 Apr 2020

    Turner Carroll Gallery is proud to present our virtual booth for Dallas Art Fair 2020, on view from April 14-23, 2020. This new platform allows our collectors to digitally preview and purchase works from our gallery before the fair’s upcoming twelfth edition, which has been rescheduled to October 1-4, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Greg Murr: A Mediated Garden

    11 Apr 2020 – 02 May 2020

    Greg Murr is fascinated by the notion that so much of the observable world exists outside our scope of everyday awareness yet remains within the limits of our sense perception. At any given moment, phenomena are at play all around us, shaping our surroundings and the parameters of our existence, whether acknowledged, presumed or missed altogether. About the work, Greg says “physical laws, fluid dynamics, patterns of growth in nature, and even the sociological and economic models that govern our lives—together, such frameworks define our reality. I make artwork to look at the aesthetics and implications of these unseen structures shaping our consciousness and providing us a means of navigating our environment, often without our recognition.”

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Keep the Ball Rolling

    27 Mar 2020 – 27 Apr 2020

    Our exhibition Keep the Ball Rolling takes its title from Judy Chicago’s Resolutions series work by the same name. The exhibition features vibrant works that inspire mind, body, and heart.

  • Turner Carroll Gallery

    Burned: Women and Fire

    04 Apr 2020 – 30 Apr 2020

    Fire is one of the most potent symbols in human history. It purifies, illuminates, destroys, and transforms. “Mother Earth” has fire in its core. That magma—hot, molten rock—is an igneous rock. The name igneous comes from the word ignis, which means “fire” in Latin. This fire sporadically pushes its way through cracks in the earth’s crust and erupts from volcanoes, burning everything in its path to create a way for new life to emerge from the magma. Wildfires act in the same way, coming by surprise, expanding exponentially, and consuming fuel in its path, while simultaneously opening some types of seed pods for future growth. The first civilizations in the Near East revered forces of nature and their enormous and only modestly predictable impact on daily life. Later, they would be personified as deities. Many ancient cultures saw fire as a supernatural force: Greeks maintained perpetual fires in front of their temples, Zoroastrians worshiped and regarded fire as pure wisdom that destroys chaos and ignorance, and Buddhist cultures practiced ritual cremation to purify the body upon its release from the physical world. When early religions began transferring attributes of forces of nature to specific deities, many cultures equated fire rising from “Mother Earth” with archetypes of women. The Sumerian goddess Lilith had a fiery ability to control men. In Egypt, the serpent goddess Wadjet used fire like a snake spitting venom to burn her enemies. In the Philippines, Darago was the warrior goddess associated with volcanoes. Roman goddess Feronia was associated with the energy of reproduction and the fire beneath the earth’s crust. These ancient goddesses were fierce and powerful, and they used fire as their tool. As male rulers took political, religious, and economic power through organized conflict, the diminution of women’s power was the result. Instead of depicting women as independent forces of nature, biblical authors described them pejoratively as harlots and sinners. These authors used fire to symbolize the guiding presence of God, and Abrahamic religions embraced the destructive power of fire as the wrath of God. In the Torah/Old Testament story of Eve, her bold pursuit of knowledge was as terrifying as a fiery natural disaster. When Eve was in the Garden of Eden she “saw that the tree was good for food…and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her.” “The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat” Adam said, as he successfully blamed the woman for his choices and actions. The male God then cursed all women for Eve’s independent decision-making and disobedience: “I will greatly multiply thy sorrow…and thy husband…he shall rule over thee.” Those words of condemnation, and words like them in other male-dominated institutions, attempted to change societal perception of women from personification of fire, and its natural ability to create and destroy, into the scorned embodiment of sin. Just as early Roman Christians built churches on top of pagan temples and later placed the orb and cross atop obelisks they looted from ancient Egypt, governments usurped female power by forcing a narrative of male moral, intellectual, and physical superiority. These institutions took archetypically “female” fire as their own symbol, using it as their weapon to control and limit women’s minds, bodies, and potential. Examples of this include doctors in pharaonic Egypt using fire to cure “hysteria” by forcing the uterus (hystera) upwards. Caught between the English and French monarchs, Joan of Arc was burned alive in 1431 despite being credited previously for the French victory at the Siege of Orleans. In early modern England, women were burned at the stake as a legal punishment for a range of activities including coining and mariticide. In 1652 in Smithfield, Prudence Lee confessed to having “been a very lewd liver, and much given to cursing and swearing, for which the Lord being offended with her, had suffered her to be brought to that untimely end.” She admitted to being jealous of and arguing with her husband. For this, she was burned at the stake, as were thousands of other women. In the late 1850s, The Industrial Revolution produced gauzy new fabrics that when made into funnel-shaped dresses, ignited instantly upon being touched by a spark. Their flammability made them death traps for women, preventing them from safely doing ordinary things men could do, such as lighting a match, standing close to a fire, or smoking a cigarette, lest they be burned alive. Tragically, women are still burned to death by men today. In New Zealand in 2011, a groom doused his bride with flammable liquid, set her on fire, and left her by the side of the road to die so he could obtain a higher dowry from another. In 2015 in New Guinea, four women were tortured and burned for sorcery. Acid-burning is at an all-time high, occurring from the United Kingdom to Southeast Asia. In India and Pakistan, widows are sometimes burned with their deceased husbands in his funeral pyre, and the highly suspect “kitchen fire” is all too common. In contemporary honor killings, families burn their own daughters and sisters for making unapproved decisions about their own marriage. The United Nations estimates that as many as 5000 women are killed annually world-wide in honor killings. Today, this act is not illegal in such modern nations as Jordan. It is no wonder the element of fire is ingrained in women’s collective memory. Fire represents women’s power and their torture. In women’s own hands, it is their independent creative spark; in the hands of those who want to suppress them it can destroy their very lives. Burned: Women and Fire features artists who—like the alchemical Phoenix who burns and rises from the ashes anew—integrate their collective experience with fire and burning to create their art. Tonya Turner Carroll Santa Fe January 2020

    latest works

    • Judy Chicago

      Purple Atmosphere from the On Fire Suite, 2013/2018
      13.3 x 20 inch (h x w)
      Archival pigment print on paper
    • Vinyl: Birth Project and Erotica
      3.5 x 60 inch (h x w)
    • Judy Chicago Early Feminist and Iconic Imagery
      3.5 x 69 inch (h x w)
    • JC Vinyl Atmospheres, Fireworks, Dry Ice
      3.5 x 69 inch (h x w)
    • Judy Chicago

      Be No More, 2018
      24 x 36 inch (h x w)
      pigment print on paper
      USD
    • Judy Chicago Vinyl 1
      3.5 x 82 inch (h x w)
    • Judy Chicago

      Old, 2012
      30 x 22 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Butterfly Vagina Erotica - The Throb, 1975
      10 x 10 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Butterfly Vagina Erotica 3 - The Contact, 1975
      10 x 10 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Butterfly Vagina Erotica - The Descent, 1975
      10 x 10 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Butterfly Vagina Erotica - The Approach, 1975
      10 x 10 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Yes, I am Black and Radiant from the Song of Songs, 1999
      24 x 20 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph, multi-color woodcut, helivorelief, woodcut, hand-coloring
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Rainbow Shabbat, 1992
      30.1 x 44.3 inch (h x w)
      Serigraph and photograph on black arches
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      The Crowning, 2009-2012
      24 x 24 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Driving the World to Destruction, 1988
      30 x 40.3 inch (h x w)
      Serigraph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      The Creation, 1985
      30 x 40 inch (h x w)
      serigraph on black Arches
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Birth Trinity, 1985
      30 x 40 inch (h x w)
      serigraph on Stonehenge Natural White
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Signing the Dinner Party, 2009-2012
      24 x 24 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      The Dream of The Dinner Party, 1979
      36 x 24 inch (h x w)
      offset lithography
      USD
    • Judy Chicago

      Reaching/Uniting/Becoming Free, 1979
      41 x 28 inch (h x w)
      Serigraph
      USD
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