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Quest Art School + Gallery

Quest Art School + Gallery

3D exhibitions

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    Maples & Other Delights: The Wonders of Wye Marsh

    24 Sep 2021 – 07 Jan 2022

    Quest Art School + Gallery and Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre are pleased to present the works created from the collaborative artists-in-residence programme titled Maples & Other Delights: The Wonders of Wye Marsh This residency was undertaken by three regional artists: Holly Archer, Kasia Latos, and Aaron White. Wye Marsh and Quest Art gratefully acknowledge the support from the Government of Canada – Building Communities Through Arts & Heritage funding for this project.

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    Christian Bernard Singer: From Scattered To Contained, a Retrospective

    Since time immemorial artists have created work that has tried to articulate the ineffable; to represent the connection with whatever it was that brought our life force into existence; to explore how we are part of the world around us, and that the world also resides within us. Christian Bernard Singer’s work belongs to that legacy of art that speaks to our soul’s intuition and that asserts that knowledge and understanding of place, hope and existence lay far beyond what merely the eye can see. Since early in his practice Singer has used the materials of the earth itself to create his meditative, provocative – in a positive sense, explorations around purpose, existence and meaning. This isn’t limited to the artistic materials of ceramic and glass but rather the materials that the earth herself has provided: earth, moss, pine needles, leaves. With sensitivity and intentionality, Singer weaves together these elements. Regardless as to whether they have been installations in natural settings or within the confines of a gallery environment, his work speaks to questions about mortality, legacy and meaning – concerns and questions that are shared amongst all of us within the human race, and that have been debated and meditated upon for millennium. Singer’s answer, or rather continual exploration, argues that the life force we seek, the legacy that we search for, the confirmation that we will continue to exist in some form, some essence or energy, comes from the connection with that natural environment. As time passes and one season elides into the other, so too does a person’s lifetime, a culture, a civilization. Singer plays with ideas around the passage of time, reminding us of that. Cast glass body parts that peak out from living moss hint not just at lost civilizations and archaeology but are about the fact that that which was lost, buried, submerged, will once again assert itself and re-emerge, even if in a somewhat altered state. Unfired clay, painted with slip, dries out, cracks and eventually crumbles mirroring metaphorically what happens eventually to all living beings. Decelerated videos present ghostly encounters merging the historic and contemporary within a liminal lineage construction around artistic and creative legacy. And while Singer’s work speaks strongly and profoundly to spirit and intellect, his meticulous – perhaps even obsessive – attention to the process and development of his work adds another layer of excellence in which to appreciate what he is capable of creating. With Singer’s work, concept is important but executive is equally so. His works are well thought out, and have intense visual power. Whether or not, for example, someone understands colour theory or has ever heard of abstraction, when standing in front of one of his pieces such as his pine needle creations, they will have an incredible visual experience. His works draw the viewer in, revealing the underworkings over a period of time. The experience is much the same as when standing in front of a Rothko. In fact, Rothko’s words “I'm not an abstractionist. I'm not interested in the relationship of color or form or anything else. I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” could well have been written about Singer himself. Written by Virginia Eichhorn

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    Members Only Exhibition: Art Through The Ages

    12 Jul 2021 – 31 Jul 2021

    Art has a rich history of creation. Boundless and versatile, moving and changing with time, contributing to visual appearances of art as a timeline. This includes the many factors that form in the production process, they can be cultural, political, religious, or economic- and throughout this history we witness movements and ways of working. Paying attention to the ways in which art has formed in the past teaches us about our current works and our current world. This creates important connections between past and present- and reminds us that art simply is humanity. Members have been encouraged to experiment with combining techniques and visual references from artistic movements, allowing free flow and expression as we pave the path of new ways of creating while including the many forms beforehand. In this, we've asked members to think, where do you draw your inspiration from? In all of our art, we are always communicating and creating a dialogue between artist and viewer. These interactions allow for observations and produce parallels within an art history context. Create with intent as an ode to art through the ages and share with us, what movement speaks to you in your own artistic practice? This can be through ideas, materials, techniques, or subject matter. This is Art through the Ages.

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    Continuum: Featured Artists

    Quest Art is proud to feature the work of three Ontario-based artists in 'Continuum', an exhibition created to highlight the work of LGBTQ+ individuals. As June of 2021 comes to a close, we wish to emphasize that this idea of 'pride' extends beyond the month, and LGBTQ+ artists continue to push the boundaries of their works across a variety of media forms year-round. Please check out and support our featured artists below! Jason Perreault is a photographic artist based in Montreal. With a background in theatre, he is influenced by narrative techniques and the desire to create character-based images in his work. His photographs navigate the boundaries between fine art and fashion imagery, creating work that explores sexuality, queer representation, and gender fluidity. Using androgynous models, provocative posing, and unconventional styling, Perreault’s fashion photographs seek to complicate and open dialogue around the industry’s view of the body and those who occupy it. Bien dans sa peau The fashion industry and commercial advertising both participate in the construction of an idealized person—usually one that is heterosexual. The inclusion of non-binary and gender-fluid representations in magazines and editorials helps to not only normalize queer lifestyles but also validates and celebrates queer as a way of being. Bien dans sa peau highlights gender-queer people and embraces their many and varied characteristics through the tropes of contemporary fashion photography. It approaches the photography studio as a stage of sorts, a place where theatricality and performance can flourish. While the resulting imagery is heavily constructed and politically calculated, it also comes from pursuing honesty within the subjects, focusing on the respect and acceptance cultivated between photographer and subject. You can find his work at, www.jasonperreault.com Pandemic Print Series: Self Journey, Moving Forward and Sapphic Dreams Ash Randall-colalillo (3x) 8”x11” Mixed Media Prints 2021 The pandemic has left time and space for many people to be more within themselves, spending time with their thoughts, feelings as well as identity. In this time, the exploration of self becomes not only a developing process, but a transition into new mind states, which can be reflective and introspective. It brings more attention to change and flux with our perceptions of how we live. The three mixed media drawings are a result of these processes, presenting as an active visual journal. It is a conversation the artist has with themself in this new space. Each print of this series touches upon different reflections: Self Journey is mostly self explanatory. It's a visual presentation of bodies being a space itself in which we move in, and how the process of nurturing and loving that body can be expressed. Depictions of nature and elements intertwined with the body are used to connect our love of self to the life we experience. Our bodies are the transitional space between the external world and our internal world - of our mind and soul. Here is where loving the soul and body is a lifelong act of care to be fully ourselves in each moment. Moving Forward begins a dialogue with the self in this new time that we have been given. It questions why flux is so daunting? Why does change cause anxiety - especially when its physical change? Changing environments (specifically in this case) as well as mind states can stir up the experience of where things seem up in the air. Where gravity doesn’t reside, neither does our certainty - like a dream out of reach. However, what goes up must come down- or forward in this case… And lastly Sapphic Fairy Dreams displays a celebration of queer and/or sapphic presence, with the self, others and the space around them. It cradles us, comforts us - where the queer self is truly validated as the magical beings they are, and uses humorous tropes in meme culture of things that queer folk's might like in common. Within the pandemic, our queer community has felt the struggle of being so far away from each other, and not having access to those safe spaces. The work becomes a visual reflection of appreciation for the spaces we did have access to pre-pandemic as well as the time we had to physically connect with our communities. It is a reflective moment of love, yet longing for that closeness and embracing of one another once again. Kaitlin Calbery lives in Ontario, Canada, circa 1905 where they must, on a daily basis, wage life or death struggles against wild moose, rabid beavers, flying hockey pucks, and inconsistent wi-fi signals. When they are not fending for themselves in the Canadian wilderness, Kaitlin spends their time drawing and creating motion graphics that focus on history, comedy, and the blending of the past and present. In 2021, Kaitlin graduated from Sheridan College’s Bachelor of Illustration. "I have always been enthralled by different eras and the people who lived in them. While there always seems to be a disconnect next to oil paintings and somber portraits; journals, newspapers, and other media tells us a different story - and as someone who enjoys comedy, I believe laughter is the best way to bridge the gap between the past and present. These shorts are a blend of modern social media mores set against a vibrant background of the not so distant past and the people who occupied it, creating a fusion of old and new, and giving new meaning to the age old phrase ‘we are not amused’. Portraiture has always been about statements - be it political or personal. In many ways, the women in these portraits have remained icons throughout the centuries; though much of their histories, personalities, and stories have been lost to time, leaving only the impression of an idealised version of themselves within the paint. These portraits have been constructed using heavy research into the lives of six iconic women, and recontextualised and redone to showcase their individuality and oftentimes difficult lives within the spaces they occupied in order to create a truer portrait of the sitter beyond the male gaze of the artist who captured her." You can find more of their work at https://kcalbery.ca/

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    I love you as much as all the beads in the universe: a garment-based inquiry into re-stitching alternative worlds of love, an exhibition by Justine Woods

    I love you as much as all the beads in the universe: a garment-based inquiry into re-stitching alternative worlds of love by Justine Woods is a thesis exhibition presented to OCAD University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a degree of Master of Design in Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design. Justine Woods’ Master of Design thesis exhibition engages with a praxis of decolonial love through garment construction and beadwork as a practice-based method of inquiry. The body of work centres decolonial love as methodology with the expressed purpose to physically and conceptually re-stitch alternative worlds that are grounded in ethical practices and based on respect, empathy, reciprocity, consent and love. Engaging in decolonial love as praxis, the artistic production of the work presented re-frames pattern drafting, garment construction and stitching methods within decolonial and relationship-based contexts. Woods prioritizes, and foregrounds, all of the relationships that make up her identity as a Penetanguishene Aabitaawikwe and centres these relationships as praxis towards building alternative worlds of love that honour, celebrate and mobilize Indigenous internationalism, intercultural solidarity, co-resistance and liberation. Justine Woods is a garment artist, designer and beadworker based in Tkaronto. She is a current Master of Design Candidate at OCAD University and holds a Bachelor of Design in Fashion Design from Ryerson University. Justine’s design practice investigates the ways fashion and garment-making practices facilitate, activate and mobilize Indigenous resurgence. Her work prioritizes all of the relationships that make up her identity as an Aabitaawikwe; an identity she has inherited from her family and her Aabitaawizininiwag Ancestors. Her Ancestors come from Drummond Island (in what is now known as Michigan) and were relocated in 1828 to Penetanguishene, Ontario where they built diasporic roots alongside their community and kin that continue to hold strong to this present day. Justine was born and raised in Tiny, Ontario and is a member of what is currently and presently known as the Georgian Bay Métis Community.

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    Quest Art Presents The Art of Daydreaming

    12 Mar 2021 – 01 Jun 2021

    Quest School and Art Gallery Presents our Members Only Exhibition: The Art of Daydreaming This year has been one of stillness for many, some experiencing a pace set slower than usual. While much of its impact has been seen through a lens of loss, isolation, and suffering, it has also given us time to reimagine and focus on the positive. What connects us. What we want the world to look like in the future. What gives us hope. When we individually sit down, and allow our minds to envision a better world, a brighter and more beautiful space, and imagine something more, what does this look like to YOU? Daydreaming is like a muscle function that exists when we choose to engage in it, when we choose to let our minds wander. Some of our most profound and definitive thoughts come from the ease that is detachment from our external tasks. It forces us inward, to a stream of consciousness that flows throughout, allowing creative and uninterrupted forms of reflection. These reflections and visualizations come with little to none of the judgements of impracticality. They reflect and encourage our own perceptions and form our realities. These shared experiences but deeply personal visions can manifest in visions of artistry and new ways of making. What is it that you visualize? How does the importance of exercising imagination as a form of learning impact your sense of creation? Quest Art has invited our members to participate in a virtual invitation with the theme “The Art of Daydreaming”. We have found works that are representations of these visions that present a variation of visuals that can be interpreted as dream-like pieces that provide insight into each artist.

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    ASAP - Artists' Responses to COVID 19

    22 Feb 2021 – 23 Apr 2021

    The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Canada was announced on January 25, 2020. As case numbers increased, a state of emergency was declared on March 17, 2020. This state of emergency led to the implementation of restrictions on gatherings and commerce, impacting the day-to-day life of everyone in Ontario. Communities, schools, and workplaces had to work quickly to adapt to these changes. Working to adjust to the “new normal” while coming to terms with the closure of businesses deemed non-essential by the government. Over the past year we have all had to adapt and change the way that we connect with our friends, family, and co-workers. COVID-19 and provincial lockdown orders have led to increased feelings of isolation, sedentary behaviour, an increase in stress, and anxiety. However, this year of has also highlighted the ways in which people have been able to adapt to these challenges, maintain relationships, and re-evaluate what is important to them. This exhibition showcases works that demonstrate responses to COVID-19 and the ways that these artists have been able to stay connected despite the isolation and fear that have come as a result of a global pandemic. These works of art that demonstrate slivers of hope in times of fear and uncertainty. We would like to thank the Town of Midland for their ongoing support of this project. If you are interested in any works on display, please reach out to questartisabel@gmail.com to be connected with the artist.

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    RBC FOUNDATION & QUEST ART PRESENTS A FORCED GROWTH, AN EXHIBITION BY AARON WHITE

    01 Feb 2021 – 31 May 2021

    The idea of the self portrait has changed and shifted in the ways it functions throughout art history. We have seen it evolve from the earliest known representation that existed in 1433, a painting by Jan van Eyck. Since, the genre has become widely popular after the Early Renaissance era where many artists began creating depictions of one’s self as subject matter for paintings, drawings, as well as sculptures. Contemporarily this is utilized in all mediums and provides a voice for individual expression in art. The usage of self portraiture has been seen as a character study and has grown and become a direct portrayal of not only the artist’s aesthetic choices but a declaration of emotion, reflection as well as an exploration of one’s inner workings. Artist statement A Forced Growth By Aaron White In the low lighting of a lamp and candles in the late evening often is when I find my inspiration and also the time I find I have no energy to paint. A couple times I fell asleep sitting at my easel. I chose this time to reflect on the day, much like a diary, I painted a self portrait once per day each day of December. As I started I wasn’t exactly sure where the project would take me, I quickly found myself striving to achieve a different result for each painting as one tends to get bored of repetition.

 At times throughout these works there is a clear presence of mental and physical exhaustion alongside personal growth and learning to paint portraits was a goal of 2020. With everyone experiencing such different & new challenges, I found myself at the point where sleeping and dreaming was my favourite place to be. Often I try to capture that dream as a state in my work. Keeping positive with the new world situations seems as though a forced growth begins to blossom. 

This project is a series of daily self-portrait paintings surrounding a larger portrait piece. I displayed my personal process of moving forwards when it comes to heartbreak, emotional exhaustion, anxiety, and depression. This body of work explores what it means to live through personal growth. I saved the palettes from these smaller portraits to incorporate into the larger portrait to capture the highs and lows of my emotions, and to reclaim that image of myself through my true, daily experiences that makes one whole. Through working with my mentors on this project I feel as though it gave me an opportunity for a different approach. I noticed this specifically through conversations as well as working directly with them that different styles appear throughout. Roughly 4 years ago my journey with painting really began when I was gifted a set of oils. After practicing landscapes and landscapes, The world has turned and left me here – Weezer A major inspiration has always been listening to all kinds of music constantly. As I sit with a blank canvas, music to fill the room, I feel as if my paint brush is being guided, or as if there is something that has the be released from mind to canvas. Lots of my art is created from the mind. I find it like a sword battle that one has to keep fighting to see victory. I want to take this chance to thank Quest Art & RBC Foundation

 My family & friends Ross & Joel for mentoring the project Abigail & Erin Virginia, Paul, & Joseph Eichhorn Bill Waters Shaelyn L. Bob Ross Northeastbeats – “Move & create bound to be great” And so so many more, all those who’ve help me grow and make it all possible. Aa. About the RBC Art Incubator and Residency Programme: The Arts Incubator provides access to arts-based learning through producing compelling artistic experiences for the participants and the audiences. The programme includes long and short-term residences, workshops and other forms of creative engagement. Our goal through-out this programme is to create opportunities for emerging artists to have a rich, sustained experience with other artists, to provide mentorship opportunities, and to allow for inter-cultural understanding which will foster the facilitation of complex interactions that transcend differences and which will go beyond the traditional expectations of passive art interactions. Through this programme artists will be able to upgrade their discipline based artistic competencies, and, will develop new ways to artistically engage with their audience. Statement from Mentor Ross Skoggard: There is a wonderful object, handcrafted out of cedar. It is about 8 inches tall and ten inches wide and 4 inches deep. It was four rails spanning the four corners on which are 18 moveable pegs. This object was presented to me by Aaron White the first time Virginia Eichhorn brought him over to meet me. Aaron explained the object of his own design and manufacturer was a rack for storing artist’s paint brushes between painting sessions so they don’t dry out. It looks like a cross between a Danish modern loom and an abacus and it's too pretty for the studio so I keep it in my living room. This piece says a lot about Aaron and his approach to his art. It is ingenious, well- crafted and original. It reveals that he takes a strongly artisanal approach to his work. It identifies and solves a problem all painters encounter with the mindset of an ouvrier. The second or third time we met he challenged me to take a more “hand’s on” approach to my practice by inviting me to make a portrait of him using no brushes, just my fingers. The resulting portrait is like nothing I’ve ever painted before. It is like nothing I’ve ever seen before and I wouldn’t have thought of doing anything like it if not for my experience of working with Aaron. I knew from the beginning that working with Aaron was going to be far from a one way street. Whatever I passed on to him in terms of a traditional approach to materials and composition, he was going to more than compensate me with his focussed and workmanlike dedication to process. I have been amazed to watch his heroic self- portrait project progress. Aaron trusts his viewer to get it and when they don’t, to take another hard look and maybe challenge some of their own assumptions of what a work of art should or can be. I thank you for the opportunity to participate in this stimulating project. Statement from Mentor Joel Richardson: Working with Aaron was a unique experience. A skateboarding kid from a small town who didn't want to leave for the big city was intriguing. I celebrated his desire to use art in exploring who he is and who he wants to be. It is not always easy to be an artist, 7 days a week 365 days a year. The series of self-portraits Aaron tackled I hope pushed him out of his comfort zone. It forced him to go back to the well day after day, looking himself in the eye, trying to see further or deeper. He stepped up to the challenge in creating every day for a month. His accomplishment was admirable, and honest. The paintings were full of energy and showed an obvious likeness of the painter. I am interested to see what Aaron takes from this experience going forward. The gallery and mentors gave form to the process, a form that Aaron will now need to create on his own. I encourage him to continue his journey, and I would very much like to see what would come from continuing such hard and focused work. Congratulations Aaron. Paintings are available for purchasing upon further request. If interested, please contact questarterincoholan@gmail.com

  • Quest Art School + Gallery

    TD 2020 Annual Juried Exhibition: Quest for The Environment

    11 Jan 2021 – 11 Jan 2022

    TD THOR WEALTH MANAGEMENT JURIED EXHIBITION: Quest for the Environment For three years now, TD Thor Wealth Management and Quest Art School + Gallery have partnered together on an annual juried exhibition. Quest Art had run a juried exhibition previous to that, but it was through the sponsorship of TD Thor Wealth Management that we were able to take it from a primarily regionally focused exhibition to one of national reach. Since 2018, the exhibition has received submissions by artists from across Canada – literally from Newfoundland to British Columbia. Each year, the number of submissions continues to grow. This is the first year that we will be presenting the exhibition virtually, so that everyone can have an opportunity to "visit" the exhibition and view the works selected. Jurors consistently comment that “The quality and skill level of the submissions were both impressive and inspiring.” This year, for the first time, we introduced a theme for our juried exhibition: Quest for the Environment. Artists were asked to create submissions that reflect the material and ecological consequences of what the role of the artist is, and can be, in this new age of the “Anthropocene”, a recently proposed term indicating that we have entered a new geologic era in which human impact on the planet measures at the scale of the geologic. Artists were challenged as to how they can respond to this unprecedented moment of ecological crisis. Issues around the environment are a key component to the programming that we do here at Quest Art. Our Artist-in-Residence programmes have been delivered in partnership with Wye Marsh & Conservation Area and Georgian Bay Islands National Park. In addition to looking at our relationship with nature, a number of those residencies also explore Indigenous and Settler relations, and how Reconciliation can be enacted in a meaningful, positive way. Given that concern with the environment is a significant component in the kind of projects and programmes that we undertake as part of our ongoing operations, choosing the theme “Quest for the Environment” seems timely and appropriate. JURORS Pamela Edmonds: Senior Curator, McMaster Museum of Art Originally from Montreal, Edmonds holds a BFA in studio art/art history and an MA in art history from Concordia University. She began her curatorial career in Halifax beginning in the late 1990s, holding programming positions at the Anna Leonowens Gallery (Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University), the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dalhousie Art Gallery, Mount Saint Vincent University and the Centre for Arts Tapes to name a few. She has also held curatorial positions at A Space Gallery, Toronto, the Art Gallery of Peterborough, and most recently at the Thames Art Gallery in Chatham, Ontario where she served as the Curator/Director. Edmonds has been an advocate for inclusive curatorial practices and cultural equity throughout her career, which is evidenced by her work with numerous collectives and grassroots organizations including Third Space Art Projects, a curatorial collective focused on program development from a intercultural perspective, and most recently with the We Curate, We Critique Collective, a mentorship and networking initiative for Black Canadian writers and curators. Besides authoring numerous exhibition publications, her writing has appeared in Canadian Art, Prefix Photo, Arts Atlantic, M,I,C,E, magazine, RACAR (revue d’art canadienne / Canadian Art Review), and she currently serves on the Editorial Advisory for C Magazine. John Hartman: Artist John Hartman is one of Canada’s preeminent painters, known for his gestural and impasto depictions of some of the country’s most iconic landscapes. In his early pastels, etchings and paintings, Hartman seamlessly intertwined stories and place, depicting personal and more generally-known narratives in his skies. While narrative elements still occasionally appear in his work, Hartman’s most recent series, The Great Divide Traverse and Canadian Authors, focus on place as experienced by specific individuals who have captivated Hartman with their encounters. Hartman paints their portraits, larger than life, above the landscapes they describe. Hartman was born in Midland, Ontario in 1950. He has exhibited extensively in Canada as well as in New York, New Orleans and London, England. His work was the subject of two widely acclaimed travelling museum exhibitions, CITIES (2007-2010) and Big North (1999-2001). In 2008, Hartman’s drypoint etchings were shown alongside those by David Milne in the exhibition, Invention and Revival at the Carleton University Art Gallery. Collections include the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, the New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans and the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax. Earl Miller: Critic and Curator Earl Miller is an independent curator and art writer based in Toronto. He has curated exhibitions across Canada in public galleries and institutions such as the Doris McCarthy Gallery, the Yukon Art Centre, the Tree Museum, and the Art Gallery of York University. He has written catalogue essays for galleries and institutions including the National Museum of Romania, the Art Gallery of Hamilton, and Le Crédac: Centre d’Art Contemporain d’Ivry. His essays have also appeared in books, and he has contributed to numerous visual arts periodicals including Art in America, Canadian Art, and Flash Art. He is a member of the International Association of Art Critics, through which he presented a paper at AICA-Korea’s 2014 AICA International Congress in Seoul, South Korea, in 2014.

    latest works

    • Christian Bernard Singer

      Red II (Down and Up), 2019
    • Christian Bernard Singer

      Initiation/Spring, 2003
    • Kasia Latos

      Harvest (Detail), 2021
      12 x 36 inch (h x w)
      Hand-Knotted Cotton Thread, Wood Burning
      CAD 3000
    • Holly Archer

      Canoe View - Wye Marsh Eco Field Sketch Series, 2021
      17.5 x 14.5 inch (h x w)
      CAD 375
    • Holly Archer

      Swan with Lillypads - Wye Marsh Eco Field Sketch Series , 2021
      17.5 x 14.5 inch (h x w)
      CAD 375
    • Holly Archer

      Waterlily Close Up - Wye Marsh Eco Field Sketch Series, 2021
      14.5 x 17.5 inch (h x w)
      CAD 375
    • Holly Archer

      Artist on Dock - Wye Marsh Eco Field Sketch Series, 2021
      17.5 x 14.5 inch (h x w)
      CAD 375
    • Holly Archer

      From the Dock - Wye Marsh Eco Field Sketch Series , 2021
      14.5 x 17.5 inch (h x w)
      CAD 375
    • Holly Archer

      Edgar and Allan (Raven) - Portraits of Prey Series, 2021
      20 x 16 inch (h x w)
      CAD 525
    • Holly Archer

      Rusty (Red Tailed Hawk) - Portraits of Prey Series, 2021
      16 x 20 inch (h x w)
      CAD 525
    • Holly Archer

      Hans (Harris Hawk) - Portraits of Prey Series , 2021
      16 x 20 inch (h x w)
      CAD 525
    • Holly Archer

      Guy Smiley (Ferruginous Hawk) - Portraits of Prey Series, 2021
      20 x 16 inch (h x w)
      CAD 525
    • Holly Archer

      Becker (Great Horned Owl) - Portraits of Prey Series, 2021
      20 x 16 inch (h x w)
      CAD 525
    • Holly Archer

      Ziibi (Bald Eagle) - Portraits of Prey Series , 2021
      20 x 16 inch (h x w)
      CAD 525
    • Aaron White

      The Swan Hut (Detail), 2021
      17 x 12 inch (h x w)
      mixed media sculpture
    • Aaron White

      The Swan Hut (Detail), 2021
      12 x 17 inch (h x w)
      mixed media sculpture
    • Aaron White

      The Swan Hut, 2021
      12 x 17 inch (h x w)
      mixed media sculpture
    • Aaron White

      My Perfect Summer View, 2021
      48 x 60 inch (h x w)
      CAD 650
    • Aaron White

      An Adventure Begins, 2021
      16 x 12 inch (h x w)
      Oil
      CAD 120
    • Aaron White

      J23 - Charlie, 2021
      16 x 12 inch (h x w)
      Oil
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