Menu

Medaille Trust

Medaille Trust

Medaille Trust

3D exhibitions

  • Medaille Trust

    Unmasked

    18 Oct 2020 – 17 Nov 2020

    Participatory photography project- Medaille "This is me, I’m shut. This is how I have protection.” "I see the blue, I’m feeling happy, good, free - I can talk with god.” “This is a reflection of what I aspire - to have inner peace, It says a lot, more calm and hope for the future, it’s not always going to hard and muddy. Also I’m afraid when I look a the image with the depth of the water - the darkness.” "It was all darkness now there is light coming in.” “We can get through even hard times- we can find good even in difficult times in our lives." “you can’t see what I feel when I wear this mask. I am free to feel.” Exhibition introduction These photographs were taken by women living in Medaille Trust safe houses during December 2019 to February 2020. Medaille Trust supports men and women who have been trafficked to the U.K and who are survivors of modern day slavery. Medaille wanted to run a series of photography workshops to give the participants an opportunity to engage creatively, express themselves but mainly to have fun. The workshops were developed to encourage the participants to look around them and pay closer attention to their environment. When you are in a difficult place emotionally it can be hard to see outside of oneself and hard to have any motivation or interest. The aim was to use the photography as an interruption to this state of mind, to create a workshop that would require participants to observe and connect not only to the space around them but also using portraiture to connect to each other. In the portraiture sessions participants wore masks, this was a device used to protect their identities. Mask work is very powerful and women expressed varying responses from feeling very free to feeling scared. As workshop leaders we were delighted to witness all the laughing and playing as women tried on the various masks and set up photographing one another. Some women were able to feedback in the moment their experiences but due to Covid 19 we, the workshop leaders, were unable to return to the houses to hear more about the images made and expand on this as we had hoped. Fiona Yaron-Field and Mina Boromand Special thanks This project has been supported by many people including all the dedicated staff at Medaille Trust Safehouses especially Marc, Zoe, Rita and Bernice. Many thanks to Liz Orton, Jenny Mathews and Heather McDonough for generous support with equipment. Thanks to Pete Dowes from Chicken Shed Theatre Company and his amazing masks. Most importantly the women who made these great images and were open and willing to participate.

  • Medaille Trust

    Belongings

    15 Sep 2020 – 15 Nov 2020

    PLEASE CLICK ON EACH IMAGE TO FIND QUOTES FROM CLIENTS Belongings Belongings portrays the surviving mementos of women trafficked to the UK for forced sexual and/or labour exploitation. “I asked the women – now in Medaille Trust safe houses – if they had an object that had made the journey with them, something they held onto from their country of origin. I imagined the object would be the vehicle to reveal their stories without revealing their identity and exploiting them further. “Some women had nothing. For many, it was attached to their bodies. Others asked me to photograph what gave them hope today. As each object was offered and its story told, I slowly recognised a repeating theme – that the object was precious because it held an attachment to a loved one. “It is through relationship that our identity is formed and flourishes. These mundane objects, overlooked by their captors, enabled the women to hold onto their sense of self. A self that made them resilient and ultimately gave them the power to escape. “For over three years I worked as a psychotherapist with trafficked women. Belongings comes out of this experience. While traffickers intentionally strip women of their worth to control them, these objects and photos reflect the women’s quiet strength of spirit – a sign of their extraordinary resistance.” – Fiona Yaron-Field, photographer. About Fiona Yaron-Field Fiona Yaron-Field is a British artist and psychotherapist. Through subjects close and personal, she reflects on bigger social and cultural issues. Fiona has a collaborative approach, so that the act of photography is an empowering experience for subject and photographer. Fiona has participated in symposiums, publications and international exhibitions. She is one of the founders of 'Uncertain States' and author of 'Up Close', a book which describes her relationship with her daughter, Ophir, who has Down's Syndrome. Fiona works as student counsellor, runs art therapy groups and has a private psychotherapy practice.

    exhibiting artists

      latest works

      • Heart
      • Is twenty weeks. This is all I have
      • I was with one man in a car and he stop in gas petrol and he go in shop for carburant and I escape, yes.
      • Rose
      • "I want to to be safe enough to be seen."
      • I am looking to the future, I am very hopeful now
      • I was brought to UK at nine years old by a woman who pretended to be my mother. Now I am stateless. I don't have anything, only memories. They are not good but I will use them to give me power and encourage other women.
      • Expectant
      • "I see the blue, I’m feeling happy, good, free - I can talk with god.”
      • When he ended the engagement he told me to keep the ring. I have tried to sell it but I can't because it reminds me how strong I was at the time.
      • She's my everything, I love her so much. She's what's keeping me going. She's my happiness.
      • I want to wear this colourful dress for my photograph. It is a present I just received from a good friend. It makes me happy because it is bright and beautiful. I don't want things that remind me of my past.
      • I hold it for three years in my hand and when I come here I refuse to let it. I hold it in my room, every night and every day I hold it in my hand even when I do the shower. I don't want to take it off. I kiss and hold it, the symbol that help me go
      • After my grandad died I made this tattoo. I love him so much I wanted a memory of him. Every time I am feeling lost and have no one or I have nothing I see this tattoo and I feel like I have someone with me
      • This book is a story about a man who was detained in Australia after he claimed asylum; they detained him for six years.
      • The ankle bracelet triggers terrible memories because I’ve worn it round my ankle ever since I left my country. When I got to the safe house I felt I could remove it and lock it in a box.
      • My father give to me when I was child three-four months old. He put it around my neck, so special to me - I love that cross.
      • This my pen.
      • Before our marriage my husband brought gifts of gold jewellery to me and my family. That was a long time ago and only the earrings have survived.
      • When I lived in a care home my best friend and I made the same tattoo on the same place on our arm. I love knowing she sees the same on her arm and even now we are apart we are always connected. It gives me strength.
        Cookies help us to provide certain features and services on our website. By using the website, you agree that we use cookies. Privacy policy