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Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

The Gregory Allicar Museum of Art invites individuals to engage with art and each other to inspire fresh perspectives and wonder. Always free and open to all, the museum is a catalyst for visual literacy and critical thinking that instills a passion for learning.


With a growing and diverse collection of approximately 4,000 works of art and dynamic programing, the museum is a cornerstone of Colorado State University’s arts initiatives and a link to alumni, Fort Collins, and our region. The museum, is dedicated to educational vitality, embracing all audiences, and to honoring a diversity of art making across time periods, geographies, and cultures.


Always free and open to all, the museum is located in the University Center for the Arts, and includes more than 10,000 square feet of galleries, augmented by teaching facilities and an additional 4,000 square feet of state-of-the-art collection storage facilities and exhibition preparation spaces. The Gregory Allicar Museum of Art is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, one of fewer than 4% of museums in the nation with the distinction.


Gregory Allicar Museum of Art relies on the contributions of friends who help us fulfill our mission. Your financial support helps to fund our exhibitions, collection care and educational outreach programs.


1400 Remington street, 80523, Fort Collins, CO

3D exhibitions

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    MFA Thesis Exhibition 2020

    19 Dec 2020 – 31 Dec 2021

    The annual Master of Fine Arts Exhibition at Colorado State University marks the culmination of a three-year degree program in the visual arts that fosters individual research and creative studio practice. Students in the program focus on a particular area of study and complete a mature body of work in their chosen field – artwork is situated within the discourse of contemporary art practice. This year’s exhibition features work by Samuel Dong Saul (graphic design), Lauren Faherty (sculpture), Jasmine Holmes (drawing), Jacob Jaso (fibers), Janine Thornton (fibers), and Isaac Trujillo (printmaking). Things went a bit differently than planned.

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    Women's Textiles Across Africa: The Symbolic and the Practical

    09 Oct 2020 – 31 Dec 2021

    Across the African continent women are integral members of their communities, contributing as leaders, artists, entrepreneurs, and spiritual guides. While historically charged narratives led to misunderstood, romanticized, and stereotyped perspectives of African women through Western lenses, revised approaches toward understanding the role of women across the continent are presenting new inclusive dialogs. This exhibit will re-introduce visitors to a broad view of women’s lives across the African continent by highlighting a selection of textiles designed, crafted, and worn by women to celebrate their status, identity, wealth, and role in maintaining equilibrium in African societies. This exhibition was curated by CSU LEAP Institute for the Arts intern Abby Rose under the supervision of Dr. David Riep, Associate Professor and Area Coordinator, Art History, Department of Art and Art History, and Associate Curator of African Art. Support for this project is generously provided by Colorado Creative Industries and by the FUNd Endowment at CSU.

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    Clara Hatton: A Vision for Art at CSU

    08 Feb 2021 – 31 Dec 2021

    In 1936, Clara Hatton (1901-1991) came to Colorado State College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts as one of the earliest faculty members to teach design in the Division of Home Economics. Over the next thirty years, Hatton built an art curriculum at the college, teaching a variety of media herself and hiring the faculty who would help her establish the Department of Art in 1953. This exhibition demonstrates the breadth of Clara Hatton’s art–from bookbinding to oil painting, printmaking to calligraphy, ceramics to weaving–and honors the founder of the Department of Art & Art History at Colorado State University. Curated by Dr. Emily Moore, Associate Professor of Art History and Associate Curator of Art, Colorado State University, and Bill North, independent curator and former director of the Salina Art Center, Kansas. This project is made possible by the FUNd Endowment at CSU. Museum operating support is generously provided by Colorado Creative Industries. CCI and its activities are made possible through an annual appropriation from the Colorado General Assembly and federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    C.A.R.S. Online: Courtney Egan

    16 Dec 2020 – 31 Dec 2021

    The artist-curated C.A.R.S. Online series features past participants in the long running Critic & Artist Residency Series, with virtual exhibitions bringing together the artists’ own work and works from the museum’s collection. Courtney Egan, who visited CSU in 2014, is based in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her projection-based sculptural installations mix botanical themes and technology. This exhibition presents new and existing work by the artist set in dialogue with her selections from the museum’s collection, all speaking to relationships between the natural and human-made.

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    Mauro Giaconi: C.A.R.S. Online

    20 Nov 2020 – 20 Nov 2021

    C.A.R.S. Online is a series of virtual exhibitions curated by past participants in the Critic & Artist Residency Series at the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, which was founded in 1997 to bring prominent artists, critics, and curators to the Colorado State University campus for public lectures, classroom visits, and exhibitions. C.A.R.S. Online is a combination “artist intervention” and monographic exhibition, bringing together the artists’ own work and works from the museum’s collection. Mauro Giaconi was the museum’s Critic & Artist Residency Series visitor in Fall 2018. The artist’s work takes place in the field of sculpture, installation, and mainly drawing, which operates as the heart of all his production and starting point to generate spatial interventions and imagery that moves across the aesthetics of chaos and procedural investigation. Architecture, structure, memory and environment are all key elements in the artist’s practice, which focuses on proposing experiences that build tension between opposite concepts like construction and destruction; birth and death; confinement and freedom; depth and surface; dream and awakening. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Mauro Giaconi lives and works in Mexico City. He began his training in architecture at the University of Buenos Aires before moving to the visual art at the National School of Fine Arts, where he graduated in 2001 with the title of National Professor of Painting. He has had monographic exhibitions at prestigious institutions around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art of Buenos Aires, and solo shows in Mexico City, São Paulo, Paris, Marseilles, Berlin, and New York City, to name a few. His long list of prizes and fellowships includes participation in the Artistic Research Center in Buenos Aires, the Skowhegan School of Paintings and Sculpture in Maine, and Omi International Art Center in New York. Giaconi also co-founded ObreraCentro, a non-profit independent art space, and more, in Mexico City, dedicated to interdisciplinary experimentation. He was a Critic and Artist Residency visitor to Colorado State University in conjunction with the exhibition Spatial Flux: Contemporary Drawings from the JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey Collection, curated by graduate students in the Department of Art and Art History. C.A.R.S. Online is made possible in part through a grant from the Lilla B. Morgan Memorial Endowment, which works to enhance the cultural development and atmosphere for the arts at Colorado State University. This fund benefits from the generous support of all those who love the arts. Additional support is provided by the FUNd Endowment at CSU and by Colorado Creative Industries. CCI and its activities are made possible through an annual appropriation from the Colorado General Assembly and federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    Hartford-Tandstad Collection Galleries

    The Hartford-Tandstad Collection came to the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art in 2014, approximately 200 works of art, including drawings, paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts, primarily dating from the late Renaissance through the 19th century. A selection of works is housed in three galleries, focused on themes of Global Encounters, Approaching Nature, and Dialogues with Power. Additional works from the collection are featured in rotating exhibitions.

  • Gregory Allicar Museum of Art

    Binh Danh: C.A.R.S. Online

    24 Aug 2020 – 25 Aug 2021

    The artist-curated C.A.R.S. Online series, of which this is the first, features past participants in the long running Critic & Artist Residency Series. Founded in 1997, the series brings prominent artists, critics, and curators to the Colorado State University campus for public lectures, classroom visits, and exhibitions. The new virtual exhibitions bring together the artists’ own work and works from the museum’s collection, shedding new light on familiar objects and drawing out themes and artistic sources in the artist-curator’s works. Binh Danh holds a special place in the museum’s history. In addition to being a past C.A.R.S. participant, he was the inaugural artist exhibited when the art museum was founded at CSU in 2009. His chlorophyll print photograph Barracked (2005) was also the first (and until recently, only) museum purchase in CSU’s collection, a work acquired with the museum’s own funds. Other upcoming C.A.R.S. Online artist-curators will be Jess Dugan, Mauro Giaconi, Courtney Egan, and Zora Murff, and each exhibition will be on view for (at least) a year. Binh Danh (MFA Stanford; BFA San Jose State University) emerged as an artist of national importance with work that investigates his Vietnamese heritage and our collective memory of war. His technique incorporates his invention of the chlorophyll printing process, in which photographic images appear embedded in leaves through the action of photosynthesis. His newer body of work focuses on nineteenth-century photographic processes, applying them in an investigation of battlefield landscapes and contemporary memorials. A recent series of daguerreotypes celebrated the United States National Park system during its anniversary year. His work is in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern art, The DeYoung Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Center for Creative Photography, the George Eastman Museum, and many others. He received the 2010 Eureka Fellowship from the Fleishhacker Foundation, and in 2012 he was a featured artist at the 18th Biennale of Sydney in Australia. He is represented by Haines Gallery, San Francisco, CA and Lisa Sette Gallery in Phoenix, AZ. He lives and works in San Jose, CA and teaches photography at San Jose State University. C.A.R.S. Online is made possible in part through a grant from the Lilla B. Morgan Memorial Endowment, which works to enhance the cultural development and atmosphere for the arts at Colorado State University. This fund benefits from the generous support of all those who love the arts. Additional support is provided by the FUNd Endowment at CSU and by Colorado Creative Industries. CCI and its activities are made possible through an annual appropriation from the Colorado General Assembly and federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts. Related Program: Binh Danh: Interview and Studio Tour (Zoom) Wed., Sept. 9, 5 p.m. MT https://artmuseum.colostate.edu/events/binh-danh-online-interview-and-studio-tour-zoom/

    exhibiting artists

    latest works

    • Clara Hatton: A Vision for Art at CSU
      48 x 36 inch (h x w)
    • Clara Hatton's paint box
      16 x 16 x 16 inch (h x w x d)
    • Clara Hatton

      Clips with monograms and pin, ca. 1930 (clips)
      5.3 x 8 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Silver and enamel
    • Clara Hatton

      Table runner (blue)
      53.3 x 13.5 x 0.2 inch (h x w x d)
      Woven cotton; collection of Todd Goodheart
    • Clara Hatton

      Table runner (red)
      31.3 x 15.1 x 0.2 inch (h x w x d)
      Woven cotton; collection of Todd Goodheart
    • Clara Hatton

      The great white star of stars shone forth . . .
      4 x 3 inch (h x w)
      Block print with gold powder on card stock
    • Clara Hatton

      Fisherman's Breakfast, ca. 1965
      20 x 24 inch (h x w)
      Oil on linen
    • Clara Hatton

      Sonnet CXVI, by William Shakespeare, 1971
      18.3 x 12 inch (h x w)
      Pen and ink with gold powder, Ink, and gold leaf on wove paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      Peace and Happiness at Christmas Time & Throughout the Year, 1956
      4 x 3.9 inch (h x w)
      Block print with gold leaf on wove paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      Canyon Landscape, Colorado
      15.3 x 19.5 inch (h x w)
      Oil on linen over board
    • Clara Hatton

      Gloria in excelsis Deo
      5.1 x 4.1 inch (h x w)
      Block print with gold powder on laid paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      Grandma Hatton and Little Ora, ca. 1946
      9.6 x 9 inch (h x w)
      Charcoal on wove paper
    • Clara Hatton

      Mrs. Alpaugh at the Loom, 1945
      9 x 7 inch (h x w)
      Etching with drypoint on wove paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      This Little Deer from Cranbrook Bring Season's Greetings, ca. 1944
      4.3 x 2.5 inch (h x w)
      Block print with hand coloring on card stock; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      The Leopard and the Fox, 1944
      8.5 x 12 inch (h x w)
      Engraving and letterpress on wove paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      Season's Greetings, 1941
      4 x 2.2 inch (h x w)
      Etching on wove paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay
    • Clara Hatton

      Still life with floral arrangement and black pottery, 1940
      14.8 x 18.1 inch (h x w)
      Watercolor with graphite on paper; collection of Susan Elizabeth Gillin
    • Clara Hatton

      Red Tree, 1940
      13.9 x 18 inch (h x w)
      Oil on canvas board
    • Clara Hatton

      Landscape, 1940
      8.5 x 11.5 inch (h x w)
      Watercolor with graphite
    • Clara Hatton

      Pasture Lot, ca. 1940
      7.1 x 9.1 inch (h x w)
      Lithograph on wove paper; collection of Ora Hatton Shay