Menu

Galerie Biesenbach

Galerie Biesenbach

Galerie Biesenbach

Galerie Biesenbach

Die Galerie Biesenbach wurde 2012 von ihrem Inhaber Stéphane Biesenbach gegründet. Die Ausstellungsräume befinden sich im Zentrum Kölns im Galerienviertel.


Der Fokus unserer Arbeit liegt auf dem Gebiet der internationalen und zeitgenössischen Malerei, Zeichnung und Skulptur. Wir legen Wert darauf, Figuration und Abstraktion ausgewogen in unserem Programm zu zeigen.


Wir fördern junge Künstler und vertreten etablierte Positionen.


Galerie Biesenbach was founded in 2012 and is run by its owner Stéphane Biesenbach in collaboration with Bettina Ruchty. The gallery's exhibition space was located on St. Apern-Strasse in downtown Cologne’s gallery centre. It has since moved just around the corner to Haus der Stiftungen (House of Foundations), Zeughausstrasse 26, 1st floor, 50667 Köln.


The focus of our work is set on international and contemporary painting and sculpture. We attach importance to achieve a balance between figurative and abstract positions in our programme, whereby one or the other always predominates.


We promote young artists and represent established positions.


Galerie Biesenbach
Haus der Stiftungen
Zeughausstraße 26, 1. Etage (barrierefrei)
50667 Köln
(über der Galerie Seippel)

geöffnet von:
Di - Fr 12 - 18h, Sa 12 - 16h u.n.V.

3D exhibitions

  • Galerie Biesenbach

    TIME

    20 Nov 2022 – 28 Jan 2023

    Arran Rahimian, born 1991, lives and works in Edinburgh, Scotland. Rahimian studied at Leith School of Art and then went on to specialise in Sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art. The sculptural presence that an object holds plays a significant role in his work, always exposing the rawness of the surface. Arran’s work is collected by art collectors from all around the world, appreciating his ability to visualise time and movement through a line as well as capturing a reflexive element narrated through the rich exposure of colour and space. Lately, Arran Rahimian has been working closely with old books and highlighting their individual beauty. Fascinated by the mystery behind each one, he’s created his pieces using reclaimed book covers, some dating as far back as 1900. These books have aged with natural textures creating on the surfaces; over the years these marks have built a subtle and amazing feel on top of beautiful colours. On the other hand, his canvas works are a visual documentation of time, leaving natural elements to compose movement. Each canvas work is a landscape created by the landscape itself. "I consider the outdoors to be an extension to my studio; it plays a significant role in my work. My practice is conducted spontaneously and intuitively through walking. I am continually intrigued by the natural elements that surround me as their movement and presence inspire me." Rahimian’s work is a visual documentation of time and the effect of time on materials. The aim is for the viewer to focus purely on colour, texture and the subtle marks on the pieces. "As an artist, I am excited by the unpredictability and rawness of creating a painting. I do not plan my works, nor have a preconceived idea of how they will look. I look to create work that is visually stimulating without becoming overworked.“ ______ Arran Rahimian, geboren 1991, lebt und arbeitet in Edinburgh, Schottland. Rahimian studierte an der Leith School of Art und spezialisierte sich anschließend auf Bildhauerei am Edinburgh College of Art. Die skulpturale Präsenz eines Objekts spielt in seinem Werk eine wichtige Rolle, wobei er stets die Rohheit der Oberfläche freilegt. Arran Rahimians Arbeiten werden von Kunstsammlern aus der ganzen Welt gesammelt, die seine Fähigkeit schätzen, Zeit und Bewegung durch eine Linie zu visualisieren und ein reflexives Element einzufangen, das durch die reiche Darstellung von Farbe und Raum erzählt wird. In letzter Zeit hat sich Arran Rahimian intensiv mit alten Büchern beschäftigt und deren individuelle Schönheit hervorgehoben. Fasziniert von dem Geheimnis, das sich hinter jedem einzelnen Buch verbirgt, hat er seine Werke aus wiederverwerteten Bucheinbänden geschaffen, von denen einige bis ins Jahr 1900 zurückreichen. Diese Bücher sind gealtert, wobei sich auf der Oberfläche natürliche Texturen gebildet haben, die im Laufe der Jahre eine subtile und erstaunliche Haptik und schöne Farben hervorgebracht haben. Auf der anderen Seite sind seine Leinwandarbeiten eine visuelle Dokumentation der Zeit, wobei die natürlichen Elemente die Bewegung komponieren. Jede Leinwandarbeit ist eine Landschaft, die von der Landschaft selbst geschaffen wird. „Ich betrachte die Natur als eine Erweiterung meines Ateliers; sie spielt eine wichtige Rolle in meiner Arbeit. Meine Praxis entsteht spontan und intuitiv beim Gehen. Ich bin immer wieder fasziniert von den natürlichen Elementen, die mich umgeben, da ihre Bewegung und Präsenz mich inspirieren." Rahimians Arbeiten sind eine visuelle Dokumentation der Zeit und der Wirkung von Zeit auf Materialien. Ziel ist es, dass sich der Betrachter ausschließlich auf die Farbe, die Textur und die subtilen Spuren auf den Werken konzentriert. „Als Künstler reizt mich die Unvorhersehbarkeit und Rohheit, mit der ein Gemälde entsteht. Ich plane meine Werke nicht und habe auch keine vorgefasste Meinung darüber, wie sie aussehen werden. Ich versuche, Werke zu schaffen, die visuell anregend sind, ohne überarbeitet zu wirken."

  • Galerie Biesenbach

    Klangassoziationen 1997-2022

    21 Aug 2022 – 14 Oct 2022

    Hideaki Yamanobe Klangassoziationen (Sound Associations) 1997-2022 Hideaki Yamanobe's painting must be seen in the context of artistic developments and diverse currents in 20th century America and Europe. The young painter, who comes from a famous Japanese family of calligraphers, is deeply familiar with the Japanese painting culture. He first studied the works of Cézanne and Cubism (with Prof. Ohnuma, Tokyo), then the painterly movements of the Western 'Informel' (Tobey, Mortherwell, Rothko, Gorky, Wols). Kenzo Okada (1902-82), who in the 1950s enriched Japanese painting with aspects of abstract art experienced specifically in New York, became important for Yamanobe's artistic development. In contrast to the western tendencies of 'Informel', towards the complete autonomy of the picture - the detachment of painting from real points of reference - he took Okada's basic idea with him to Europe, that a work of art is only 'alive' when the reference to nature is perceptible as a ‘natural breath’. In 1992 Yamanobe left Japan to find his artistic identity in Europe. The first 'landscape paintings' clearly indicate Okada's above-mentioned painterly intentions: they are the visualised breath of a characteristic landscape. Since 1995/96, Yamanobe - standing entirely in the tradition of Paul Klee - has been exploring the meditative possibility of finding images for musical sensations. Kiyoko Wakamatsu (1914-95), whose late abstract period ("N° 1") shows a spiritual as well as painterly connection to Klee and Kandinsky - but also to Miro - must be considered as a decisive impulse for the 'new phase' of his work. It is not only the personal encounters with the painter that have a stimulating effect, but also the close relationship of both to music: Kishiko, Wakamatsu's wife, is a pianist, and it must not go unmentioned for the understanding of the 'sound associations': Yuko Suzuki, an internationally performing soloist, is Yamanobe's wife at the time. Small panels of simple form provide the basis, conceived as resonating bodies as well. Painting grounds are mostly traditional Japanese rice paper and canvases made of cotton nettle, stretched on high rectangular frames. Mixed techniques of oil, lacquer and acrylic paints, but also old glue and pigment techniques, as well as Japanese ink and colour formulations (natural colours of the Zen monks) are used. With partly thick spatulas and the integration of unconventional painting techniques (collages, frottages) Yamanobe succeeds in creating a palpable materiality on the picture surface. In this way he creates an exciting interplay between illusionistic transparency and painterly three-dimensionality. Light zones of varying intensity create atmospheric depth from the sensitively varied modulations and layered formal grounds. Through the skillful placement of contrasting zones occurs what the Spanish painter Antoni Tàpies called the miracle of painting: "...when dull and inert matter begins to speak with an incomparable expressive power." In these immaterialised general tones - tempered from sparse colour tones: sometimes varied in earthy tones, sometimes chromatically saturated in broken complements, or laid out in cold and warm grisaille surfaces - signs are embedded that, in the moment of seeing, orchestrate themselves into pictorial sounds. Yamanobe uses the method of domestic calligraphy for this, but not the 'signs of meaning' of the old pictorial scripts. With a groping hand, he draws tactile symbols in rhythmic movements and invents musical symbols from the inexhaustible arsenal of purely 'pictorial means’, which sometimes oscillate openly, or remain hermetically and strictly enclosed. This small world of simple forms: circles, ovals, crosses, angular and line fragments indicate movement in their extension, position or deformation and the unstable rhythm or stand in the field of tension of the lines surrounding them. Enveloping and filling forms as well as interlocking shapes and surfaces are deliberately used as 'contrasts of form'. They enrich the spatial conditions, create vistas. Unformed 'blotograms' and freely gesticulating line ornaments or broken trace lines in strict parallelism initiate sound progressions pointing beyond the surface. In the interplay of form and ground, through contrasting and attenuating, overlapping and blurring, Yamanobe gives the picture surface the character of a vibrating resonance membrane in which sound chords vibrate and tones disappear into it, echoing in shadows, losing themselves in the indeterminate. This painterly-aesthetic scanning of the sensitive sensory space always remains suspended between passive acceptance and active creation of form, seeking an immediate expression for the sensual in the human being. The serial arrangement of the coherent sound units into large-scale ensembles aims at an 'orchestration' of the rhythmic structures and tonal tones. In the 'in-between' of the individual images, the polyphonic intervals fade away into reverberations - the spatial distances correspond to the pauses in the music. The overall conception of the sound creations may well follow the aesthetic considerations that Kandinsky paraphrased in analogy to nature: "Just as in music every construction possesses its own rhythm, just as in the completely 'accidental' distribution of things in nature there is also always a rhythm, so also in painting." ("On the Spiritual in Art"). Yamanobe's work is fundamentally conceptual. Only in this way can the dialogical and evocative process between pictorial unity and wholeness succeed. By rearranging the elements and contextual painting processes - which leave additions and revisions open until the end - the artist succeeds in uniting the final arrangements of the interval units into a well-ordered instrument of extraordinary sonority. In their meditative orientation, Yamanobe's "sound associations" touch on areas of the metaphysical, encourage 'contemplation'. Those who have learned that the eye sees more than the superficially objective are impressed and inspired by the sensitivity inherent in the images. - Wilfried Klausmann, 1997 -

  • Galerie Biesenbach

    Sergio Femar - Granítico

    28 Nov 2021 – 05 Feb 2022

    Die Werke von Sergio Femar (*1990 in Galicien, Spanien) erinnern an die raffinierte Materialverwendung der Arte Povera, aber er zeigt durch die verschiedenen Schnitte im Holz einen neuen Weg auf, sich ihr zu nähern. Stücke dieses Materials werden bemalt, besprüht und zusammengesetzt, um einzigartige und heitere Reflexionen zu erzeugen. „Meine Arbeit steht zwischen der Ruhe des Ateliers und dem hektischen Tempo der zeitgenössischen Kultur und ihrer Vergänglichkeit. Sie führt den Vandalen-Akt zu einem reifen Nachdenken, mit anderen Worten, sie bringt die Freuden des Schaffens zurück, ohne sich durch akademischen Druck eingeschränkt zu fühlen, indem sie das Risiko als verbindendes Element zwischen Schwindel und Gelassenheit einsetzt. Mein Projekt muss mit dem aktuellen Moment, mit der Straße verbunden sein: Kunst spiegelt die unmittelbare Gegenwart wider; sie ist Teil unseres täglichen Lebens, Objekte, die ich finde und verwandle. Ich glaube an die Idee des Vollzeitkünstlers und an die Tatsache, dass ein Kunstwerk einem ständigen Wandel unterworfen ist. Bevor ich mit der Arbeit beginne, habe ich kein anderes Projekt im Kopf, die Materialien kommen zu mir, und so beginne ich, mich mit ihnen zu verbinden, höre mir ihre Vorschläge an, lasse das Kunstwerk fließen und entwickle mich durch sie." ----- The works of Sergio Femar (*1990 in Galicia, Spain) keep a reminiscence of the refined use of material of Arte Povera, but he indicates a new way to approach it through the various cuts made with wood. Slices of this material are coloured and assembled to create unique and serene reflections. “My work stands between the calm of the studio and the frenetic pace of contemporary culture and its ephemeral nature. It leads the vandal act to a mature reflection, in other words, brings back the joys of creation without feeling restricted by academic pressure, by using risk as the connecting element between vertigo and serenity.” My project must be connected with the current moment, with the streets: art reflects the immediate present; it is part of our daily lives, objects that I find and transform. I believe in the idea of the full-time artist and the fact that a work of art is exposed to constant change. Before I start working there is no other project on my mind, materials come to me and so I start connecting with them, listening to their suggestions, I let the artwork flow and evolve by it."

  • Galerie Biesenbach

    Daniel Müller Jansen: a tense endlessness

    13 Feb 2022 – 09 Apr 2022

    Die Ausstellung „a tense endlessness“ legt den Fokus auf die Themen Architektur und Postapartheid und gewährt uns dergestalt Einblick in Strukturen moderner Satellitenstädte Kapstadts. Gezeigt werden in erster Linie Fotografien aus den sogenannten Gated Communities und Housing Projects, die Daniel Müller Jansen auf Reisen seit 2008 in Südafrika aufgenommen hat. Die Bilder aus den beiden bereits bekannten Serien „there is me & there is you“ und „Overexposed“ treten dabei in einen Dialog mit der aktuellen Werkgruppe des Künstlers - „Great Expectations“. Nach dem wichtigsten Einfluss auf seine Arbeit gefragt, antwortet Müller Jansen: „Der italienische Manierismus!“. Dieser Einfluss wird in seinen drei Projekten über neue Siedlungsformen in Südafrika deutlich sichtbar. „Eine vergleichbare Leuchtkraft und Farbigkeit, wie in manieristischen Gemälden erreiche ich durch eine gezielte Überbelichtung bei gleißendem Sonnenlicht auch in meinen Fotografien. Hierdurch werden sowohl die Künstlichkeit und Modellhaftigkeit der gezeigten Architekturen betont, als auch die Bedürfnisse und Sehnsüchte ihrer Planer und Bewohner angedeutet.“ In der Serie „there is me & there is you“ werden die Architekturen der Gates Communities wohlhabender Südafrikaner mit denen aus sozialen Wohnungsbauprojekten ärmerer Bürger gegenübergestellt. Zwischen realistischen, vertrauten Architekturteilen und bizarrer, pastelliger Farbwirkung konfrontieren die Bilder den Betrachter mit menschenleeren und von Konformität geprägten Stadtansichten. „Alle meine Fotografien besitzen eine malerische Qualität und visuelle Strahlkraft, gepaart mit einer sozio-politischen Ebene. Durch diese Ambivalenz werden meine Arbeiten oft als anziehend und irritierend zugleich empfunden. Zunächst wird der Betrachter durch die besondere Ästhetik und die Pastellfarben angezogen – auf den zweiten Blick werfen meine Fotografien jedoch Fragen über die Hintergründe zu den gezeigten Architekturen und Strukturen auf.“ In der Serie „Overexposed“ verschmelzen die Architekturen aus über 40 verschiedenen Gates Communities erneut zu einer Art Gesellschaftsportrait und zeigen Konstruktionen von Gemeinschaft und gleichzeitiger Abgrenzung. So wie der Titel zunächst die fotografische Technik des Künstlers zu thematisieren scheint, werden hier vielmehr die Haltung und Spaltung einer Gesellschaft anhand von Architekturen und ihrer Sicherheitsvorkehrungen beleuchtet. „Architekturen sind Verpackungen einer Gesellschaft und ihrer Haltung. Und als solche habe ich die Siedlungen in meinen Fotografien herausgearbeitet. Diese Serie ist demnach eine Art von Gesellschaftsportrait, dass keine Einzelschicksale zeigt, sondern vielmehr die Orte und Architekturen, die von Menschen für Menschen erdacht und erbaut wurden.“ Mit der Werkgruppe „Great Expectations“ nähert sich Müller Jansen erneut den sozialen Wohnungsbauprojekten der Peripherie Kapstadts an. Theoretisch handelt es sich bei diesen Bildern um dokumentarische Aufnahmen, man könnte sie auch als Beobachtungen zu Themen wie Armut, Ökologie und Isolation begreifen, tatsächlich sind es vielmehr soziologische Studien deren Sprache das Bild und deren Gegenstand die Architektur ist. Und so deutet der Serientitel bereits ein nahezu unlösbares Problem an, deren Bilder das Warten und die Erwartung auf poetische Weise thematisieren - seine Fotografien würdigen den Moment bei der Entstehung einer möglichen Zivilgesellschaft zwischen Hoffnung und Konstruktion, zwischen Aufarbeitung und Wiedergutmachung, zwischen Wunsch und Realität. Die Online-Ausstellung „a tense endlessness“ zeigt eine Auswahl dieser Serien, welche auch 14 Jahre nach den ersten Aufnahmen und 28 Jahre nach der Apartheid nichts an Aktualität eingebüßt haben. Im Sinne einer Kausalkette, deren Ereignisse wechselseitig Ursache und Wirkung darstellen konstatiert Müller Jansen in diesem Sinne seine Variante des Henne-Ei-Problems: „Was war zuerst da? Sollte Die Haltung einer Gesellschaft einen Einfluss auf die Architektur haben, so hat die Architektur wiederum einen Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, oder nicht? Denn trotz gemeinsamer Zukunftswünsche in der südafrikanischen Gesellschaft, stellt die Verbesserung der tatsächlichen Verhältnisse, sowie der Unabhängigkeit und Chancengleichheit eine gewaltige gesellschaftliche und politische Herausforderung dar.“ _________ The exhibition "a tense endlessness" focuses on the themes of architecture and post-apartheid and thus gives us an insight into the structures of modern satellite towns in Cape Town. On display are primarily photographs from the so-called gated communities and housing projects that Daniel Müller Jansen has taken on his travels in South Africa since 2008. The images from the two already well-known series "there is me & there is you" and "Overexposed" enter into a dialogue with the artist's current group of works – "Great Expectations". Asked about the most important influence on his work, Müller Jansen answers: "Italian Mannerism!". This influence is clearly visible in his three projects on new forms of settlement in South Africa. "I also achieve a comparable luminosity and colourfulness as in Mannerist paintings in my photographs by deliberately overexposing them to glaring sunlight. This emphasises both the artificiality and model-like quality of the architectures shown, as well as suggesting the needs and desires of their planners and inhabitants." In the series "there is me & there is you", the architectures of the gated communities of wealthy South Africans are juxtaposed with those from social housing projects of poorer citizens. Between realistic, familiar architectural elements and bizarre, pastel colour effects, the images confront the viewer with deserted cityscapes marked by conformity. "All my photographs have a painterly quality and visual radiance, coupled with a socio-political level. Because of this ambivalence, my works are often perceived as both attractive and irritating. At first, the viewer is attracted by the particular aesthetics and pastel colours – but at second glance, my photographs raise questions about the backgrounds to the architectures and structures shown." In the series "Overexposed", the architectures from over 40 different gated communities once again merge into a kind of social portrait, showing constructions of community and simultaneous demarcation. Just as the title initially seems to address the artist's photographic technique, here it is rather the attitudes and divisions of a society that are illuminated through architectures and their security measures. "Architectures are packaging of a society and its attitude. And as such, I have elaborated the settlements in my photographs. This series is thus a kind of portrait of society that does not show individual fates, but rather the places and architectures that were conceived and built by people for people." With the group of works "Great Expectations", Müller Jansen once again approaches the social housing projects of Cape Town's periphery. Theoretically, these images are documentary photographs; they could also be understood as observations on themes such as poverty, ecology and isolation, but in fact they are sociological studies whose language is the image and whose subject is architecture. And so the series title already hints at an almost insoluble problem, whose images thematise waiting and expectation in a poetic way – his photographs pay tribute to the moment in the emergence of a possible civil society between hope and construction, between reappraisal and reparation, between wish and reality. The online exhibition "a tense endlessness" shows a selection of these series, which have lost none of their relevance 14 years after the first photographs were taken and 28 years after apartheid. In the sense of a causal chain whose events mutually represent cause and effect, Müller Jansen states his variant of the chicken-and-egg problem in this sense: "What came first? Should the attitude of a society have an influence on architecture, then architecture in turn has an influence on society, or not? Because despite shared aspirations for the future in South African society, improving actual conditions, as well as independence and equality of opportunity, is a huge social and political challenge."

  • Galerie Biesenbach

    Rebecca Bournigault: We Were Never Lost

    12 Jun 2022 – 20 Aug 2022

    Rebecca Bournigault (*1970 in Colmar, lives and works in Paris) has made an international name for herself as a video and photographic artist since the 1990s. In addition to digital media, she also uses painting and drawing to devote herself to her main subject, the portrait. Bournigault's work has been shown in numerous museums, institutions and galleries and is in renowned private and public collections such as François Pinault, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris or Maison Européenne de la Photographie de la Ville de Paris. Bournigault is a contemporary portrait artist who works mainly with video, but also uses drawings, watercolours and photographs. She works with the portrait and the icon, two sides of the same coin, each referencing the real and the fictional, the model and the singular, taking care to constantly reorder things in order to better re-examine their relationship to the Other. In Bournigault's work, there is a constant tension between outside and inside, above and below, moon and sun, animal and plant. Do they love each other or tear each other apart? Does it come or is it "transverted"? And the blood, where does it come from? Where does it flow to? Is it still warm or already cold? And the music, where does it come from? Who penetrates it? Bournigault often uses pornographic films as a model for her sexually explicit watercolours, in which she portrays women - detached from the film setting - and thus stimulates reflection on the exploitation of the female body today. Rebecca Bournigault (*1970 in Colmar, lebt und arbeitet in Paris) hat sich seit den 1990er Jahren international einen Namen als Video- und Fotokünstlerin gemacht. Neben den digitalen Medien nutzt sie auch die Malerei und Zeichnung, um sich ihrem Hauptsujet, dem Porträt, zu widmen. Bournigaults Arbeiten wurden bisher in zahlreichen Museen, Institutionen und Galerien gezeigt und befinden sich in namhaften privaten und öffentlichen Sammlungen wie z.B. François Pinault, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris oder Maison Européenne de la Photographie de la Ville de Paris. Bournigault ist eine zeitgenössische Porträtkünstlerin, die hauptsächlich mit Video arbeitet, aber auch Zeichnungen, Aquarelle und Fotografien verwendet. Sie arbeitet mit dem Porträt und der Ikone, zwei Seiten derselben Medaille, die jeweils auf das Reale und die Fiktion, das Modell und das Singuläre verweisen, wobei sie darauf achtet, die Dinge immer wieder in eine neue Reihenfolge zu bringen, um ihre Beziehung zum Anderen besser neu zu hinterfragen. In den Arbeiten von Bournigault besteht eine ständige Spannung zwischen Außen und Innen, Oben und Unten, Mond und Sonne, Tier und Pflanze. Lieben sie sich oder zerreißen sie sich? Kommt er oder wird er "transvertiert"? Und das Blut, woher kommt es? Wohin fließt es? Ist es noch warm oder schon kalt? Und die Musik, woher kommt sie? Wer durchdringt sie? Oftmals dienen Bournigault pornographische Filme als Vorlage für ihre sexuell expliziten Aquarelle, in denen sie Frauen – herausgelöst aus dem Filmsetting – portraitiert und so zum Nachdenken über die Ausbeutung des weiblichen Körpers heutzutage anregt.

    exhibiting artists

    latest works

    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 60, 1962-2021
      31.5 x 22 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Pink Lady, 2022
      59.5 x 52 cm (h x w)
      Öl auf Leinwand_oil on canvas
    • Arran Rahimian

      Pear 2, 2022
      52 x 49 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Öl auf Leinwand_oil on canvas
    • Arran Rahimian

      Pear 1, 2022
      52 x 49 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Öl auf Leinwand_oil on canvas
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 72, 1937-2021
      23 x 17 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 64, 1938-2021
      28 x 23 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 62, 1930-2021
      31 x 20 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 61, 1950-2021
      33 x 20 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 58, 1962-2021
      35 x 25 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 52, 1923-2021
      32 x 21 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 36, 1937-2021
      32 x 22.5 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book, 32 x 22, 5 cm_01.jpg
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 29, 937-2021
      32 x 22 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Page 26, 1928-2021
      23 x 14 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Half, 1928-2021
      23 x 17 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book
    • Arran Rahimian

      Granton Road, Leith, 1924-2021
      23 x 10 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Mischtechnik auf gefundenem Buch_mixed media on found book, 23 x 17 cm
    • Arran Rahimian

      46 Hours, 2022
      76 x 70 x 2 cm (h x w x d)
      Öl auf Leinwand_oil on canvas
    • Hideaki Yamanobe

      Nachklänge I 23/23, 1997
      28.5 x 23 x 4.5 cm (h x w x d)
      Acryl und Sand auf Baumwollnessel
      1950 EUR
    • Hideaki Yamanobe

      Nachklänge I 22/24, 1997
      28.5 x 23 x 4.5 cm (h x w x d)
      Acryl auf Baumwollnessel
      1950 EUR
    • Hideaki Yamanobe

      Nachklänge I 19/24, 1997
      28.5 x 23 x 4.5 cm (h x w x d)
      Acryl auf Baumwollnessel
      1950 EUR
    • Hideaki Yamanobe

      Nachklänge I 10/24, 1997
      28.5 x 23 x 4.5 cm (h x w x d)
      Acryl und Sand auf Baumwollnessel
      1950 EUR