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David Benrimon Fine Art

David Benrimon Fine Art

3D exhibitions

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Nachume Miller

    David Benrimon Fine Art is pleased to present a selection of works by Nachume Miller (1949–1998), a German born Israeli artist who immigrated to New York City in 1973, where he made a name for himself in the American Modern Art scene. Miller immigrated to New York to study at the School of Visual Arts, where he would later become a professor of painting and drawing. He was quickly identified as a star on the rise and at the age of 29 was included in the Guggenheim Museum’s “Young American Artists,” Exxon National Exhibition. A decade later he was granted a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art, where his work is now part of the permanent collection. Though his career was cut short by his untimely death in 1998, Nachume exhibited at some of the most prominent galleries in New York and around the world. As a child, Miller excelled in painting. He was inspired by his father, who spent most of his days carving wood sculptures of Cubist human forms. By the age of 16, Miller was painting elaborate surreal landscapes referencing religion, politics, and the history of modern art. These earlier works show similarities to Hieronymus Bosch, Salvador Dalí, and Francisco Goya. He was enlisted in the Israeli Army and fought in the 1973 Yom Kippur War. That same year, he received a scholarship from the Israeli-American Cultural Foundation. He married his girlfriend Ruth and moved to New York to study at the School of Visual Arts. In 1977, he joined the faculty to teach painting and drawing. Over the next two decades, Nachume was prolific in the range of media, styles, and references he incorporated into his art. His paintings and three-dimensional works pay homage to artists throughout history, from the classical Greeks to Robert Rauschenberg. He prioritized craft over concept and was a disciplined painter, never neglecting workmanship in favor of a trend. His work is marked with curiosity, sincerity and intensity. Cara McCarty, an assistant curator in the department of architecture and design, organized the current show. It reveals Mr. Miller as someone who finds common ground with both Turner and Jackson Pollock - with the former's Romantic re-creations of storms at sea and with the latter's search for content in abstract gesture. Miller’s parents were both Holocaust survivors. They were separated from each other during World War II; his father was a captain on the front lines of the Russian Army and his mother took refuge with a Christian family in Lithuania. Both eventually escaped the Nazis, re-united in Germany, and fled to Israel. Nachume was born during their voyage, in Frankfurt, Germany, on January 28, 1949. He grew up in the town of Holon, Israel. Towards the end of his life, Nachume battled cancer. He passed away at the age of 49, survived by his beloved wife and three sons. Despite what he endured, however, the paintings from these years never demonstrate despair or remorse. Instead, as in all of his work, they maintain a brave optimism that celebrates the vastness and mystery of life.

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    The Water Lilies of Roy Lichtenstein

    Of the most innovative works are Lichtenstein’s Water Lilies series, a small edition on metal, which plays homage to the water lily paintings of Claude Monet. Always drawn to popular and clichéd themes, Lichtenstein takes Monet’s Water Lilies, artworks as iconographic as Mickey Mouse, and reworks them in his signature comic style, transforming them into Pop Art. Landscapes were the first time-honored art genre Lichtenstein turned to after his comic inspired Pop prints of the early 1960s. Inspired by Impressionist Claude Monet’s Nympheas, Lichtenstein furthered Monet’s exploration of light with a contemporary sensibility. Lichtenstein screenprinted solid blocks of colored sign-painter’s enamel on stainless steel to create an appearance of reflected water. Although not fully apparent in photographs, the water-lilies constantly transmogrify light and color as they engage with their surroundings, shifting and changing as the work is viewed from different angles. This immersive quality recalls Monet’s engrossing and vast canvases of ponds and water lilies that envelope the viewer. This fascination with water-lilies is a motif found throughout Lichtenstein’s oeuvre, such as in his water-lilies and Mirror series. In addition to lessons of light, Lichtenstein expanded Monet’s rejection of illusory perspective by using his comic style and careful composition. For example, Water Lilies with Cloud reverses the traditional ideas of perspective and compositional order by eliminating depth with flattened forms, and an interchangeable foreground, and background on the same plane. With a wider tonal range that includes green, orange, and yellow, Lichtenstein reduces Monet’s dancing water-lilies to diagonal stripes, cascading Benday dots and flat areas of color to symbolize movement without being illusory. Lichtenstein parodied Monet’s masterworks throughout his career, such as in Cathedrals and Haystacks in 1969, rendering them with a mass-produced quality like a machine made an impressionist painting. Of Water Lilies, Lichtenstein noted, “Instead, say, of thick and thin paint which might be the European sensibility, I’m using flat areas of color as opposed to dotted areas which imitate Benday dots in printing and become and industrialized texture rather than what we’re familiar with as a paint texture.” David Benrimon Fine Art featured the Water Lilies series in our Lichtenstein: Reflections on Pop exhibition in 2014.

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Blossoms & Awakenings

    05 May 2020 – 05 Aug 2020

    Floral still life paintings are one of art history’s most time-honored and popular genres. In Western art, flora has been imbued with personal, cultural and religious significance, manifesting indications of Spring, rebirth, hope and the ephemeral nature of human life. With rich symbolism, a rose is associated with love and passion, trees with knowledge and spiritual nourishment and white flowers with purity. New moments infuse flora’s timeless subject with new meaning. Going into this Spring season, optimistically emerging from a worldwide pandemic, we at David Benrimon Fine Art are bringing natural beauty into a time of darkness. Burgeoning and flourishing flowers symbolize regeneration and rebirth - themes resonating across all nations and societies at this very moment. Our virtual exhibition, Blossoms and Awakenings, online from May 5th to June 5th, brings together a range of original works and prints with flower motifs from the last century to investigate how blooming botanical elements inspire our collective regrowth. We are thrilled to include iconic paintings by Jonas Wood, Takashi Murakami, Marc Quinn and Yayoi Kusama and prints by Roy Lichtenstein, Tom Wesselmann, Joan Mitchell and David Hockney, among others, whose roses, irises, water lilies, hibiscus flowers, palms, sunflowers and tulips impart the blossoming energy of Spring to us all.

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Armory 2021 Booth

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Petrikovsky 2021

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Lauren Benrimon

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Booth 2

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    BOOTH

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Rethink America

    David Benrimon Fine Art is pleased to announce the fall exhibition “Rethink America,” open from October 15 to November 27, 2020. In this unprecedented turn of a new decade, our era has become characterized by efforts to rethink America’s history and delve deeply into its values and systems. Timely issues of race, gender, equality and justice have pushed artists, museums and galleries to investigate America’s nationalist histories and colonialist legacies, privilege, and styles of representation. Within the art world, museums are deaccessioning major works to diversify their programs and institutions have re-hung their collection to question the canon, confronting issues in the art world and society as a whole. “Rethink America” brings together contemporary works that challenge representation, popular culture and symbols, the American flag and its promises, and the upcoming election. Titus Kaphar’s diptych “Sacrifice,” a centerpiece of the exhibition, is a work that keenly demonstrates our country’s hidden histories and challenges styles of representation. Kaphar reconstructs accepted historical narratives and reconfigures art history to include the African- American subject. His artistic process dismantles representation in art by physically transforming his canvases with techniques of cutting, erasing, and adding tar, in order to surface suppressed histories. “Sacrifice” consists of two panels placed together; the seated white figure is cut out and transposed onto the other space, highlighting the two African- American figures in the background and bringing them to the fore. The open area becomes an active absence – revealing what has been hidden – the stories in the background. A Derrick Adam’s large-scale work from his Beauty World Series also examines how African- American experiences intersect with art history, American iconography and consumerism. To create “Style Variation 5,” Adams reproduced a digital photograph of a wig mannequin and then painted hairstyles and makeup atop in his signature fragmented style. This single head investigates the cultural construction of the human form and Black identity in America. America’s cultural identity and popular tastes have been investigated by artists for decades, each highlighting their own experience. Whereas Adams’ depicts items from beauty supply stores, wig shops, nail and braiding salons and boutiques, New York Pop artists of the 1960s, like Andy Warhol, depict middle-class consumer items like “Tomato Soup” as an American symbol. For West Coast artist Ed Ruscha, popular culture is Standard gas stations on the open road and “Cold Beer Beautiful Girls.” The American flag, our country’s most significant icon, and its presumed promises of liberty, justice and equality have been reinterpreted and questioned by artists, especially amidst this election cycle. Robert Longo and Roy Lichtenstein’s depictions of a waving flag and lady liberty is foiled by Paul Rousso’s drooping “American Flag Hung Out To Dry” and Bernie Taupin’s wrapped flag “Sleeping Beauty - Temporary Abduction.” These paintings signify current political tensions and privilege rather than represent USA’s strength and regality. Placed one after another and in different levels of distress, these flags are curated to look repetitive and to question our country. With the impeding November election and imminent need for change, our neon installation of text-based works forefront action. Deborah Kass’ “Enough Already,” Indira Cesarine’s “ACT NOW,” and Trent Alvey’s “LOVE∙FREEDOM∙VOTE” emphasize the importance of having a voice in our democracy. Other works by Robert Indiana, James Casebere, Bonnie Lautenberg and Jeff Koons poke fun at America’s current state with an eroding white picket fence and masked Statue of Liberty, nodding to our past glory and focusing on the present. At this critical moment in 2020, just moments before an election and amidst a worldwide pandemic, this is the perfect time to reinterpret history at David Benrimon Fine Art. Artists: Derrick Adams; Trent Alvey; Lauren Benrimon; Mel Bochner; James Casebere; Indira Cesarine; Robert Indiana; Rashid Johnson; Titus Kaphar; Deborah Kass; Jeff Koons; Bonnie Lautenberg; Roy Lichtenstein; Robert Longo; Paul Rousso; Ed Ruscha; Bernie Taupin; Andy Warhol. For further information and for all press inquiries, please contact Eve Wiener at eve@benrimon.com or Isabel Dicker at isabel@benrimon.com, or by phone at (212) 628-1600. Open by appointment.

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Hannah Petrikovsky

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Warhol Sets

  • David Benrimon Fine Art

    Botero 2020

    latest works

    • Yayoi Kusama

      Infinity-Nets [KLPST], 2014
      38 x 51 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Pumpkin, 1992
      11 x 14 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Infinity Nets [KUPP] [SOLD], 2016
      38 x 51 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Infinity Nets, 2014
      51 x 64 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Infinity Nets 49, 1998
      16 x 18 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Nets 70, 1997
      17 x 20 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Infinity-Nets [FWWPI], 2017
      51 x 51 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Pumpkin, 1989
      17.8 x 14.9 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Matthew Wong

      Blue Tree
      36 x 24 inch (h x w)
      Oil on canvas
    • Emily Mae Smith

      No Patience for Monuments, 2018
      12 x 9 inch (h x w)
      Oil on linen
    • Ed Ruscha

      Drib, 2015
      11 x 15 inch (h x w)
      Dry pigment and acrylic on paper
    • Nicolas Party

      Rocks, 2014
      59 x 59 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on canvas
    • Nicolas Party

      Portrait, 2015
      67 x 59 inch (h x w)
      Pastel on canvas
    • René Magritte

      SHÉHÉRAZADE, 1956
      10 x 7 inch (h x w)
      Gouache on Paper
    • Yayoi Kusama

      Pumpkin A/ABC, 2012
      57 x 57 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Loie Hollowell

      Linked Lingams in Green, Purple and Red
      28 x 21 inch (h x w)
      Oil on linen over panel
    • The Haas Brothers

      Phil Crawlins, 2015
      15 x 12 inch (h x w)
      Bronze mini coyote feet with brown goat hair
    • Julie Curtiss

      Redfaced, 2016
      18 x 14 inch (h x w)
      Acrylic and oil on canvas
    • Lauren Benrimon

      Une pomme vert, 2019
      60 x 60 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
    • Lauren Benrimon

      Élégante, 2019
      60 x 48 inch (h x w)
      acrylic on canvas
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