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DAG

DAG

3D exhibitions

  • DAG

    Ghare Baire - Looking Beyond the City

    26 Jun 2020 – 03 Jul 2020

    The fourth and final session of DAG Museum Walkthroughs in collaboration with Heritage Walk Calcutta explores the influence and the representation of the rural in the art of Bengal. In the early-1900s, while painters of the Bengal School looked to forge a pan-Asian identity through art, a movement to recover fast-fading "folk" traditions of Bengal was already underway. The cumulative efforts of many eminent cultural activists resulted in a folk revival movement, which manifested itself in different ways. We look closely at the work of Sunayani Devi, Jamini Roy, Nandalal Bose and Ramkinkar Baij in this context, to understand how they interpreted their roles as artist vis-à-vis rural lives and art practices. A different mode of engagement is evident in the 1940s, particularly in response to the Bengal famine. Artists developed a new theory of societal responsiveness, and the works of Chittaprosad, Zainul Abedin and Gobardhan Ash make it evident that a romanticized engagement with rural life was no longer sustainable. The current virtual exhibition, “Looking Beyond the City”, attempts to showcase these changes in the history of Bengal art, tracing the aesthetic and ideological turns that are visible in visual arts in the first half of the twentieth century.

  • DAG

    Ghare Baire - Looking East

    19 Jun 2020 – 30 Jun 2020

    Explore DAG's Ghare Baire museum-exhibition from home with Heritage Walk Calcutta. The Ghare Baire collection features three centuries of art from Bengal, tracing the evolution of the visual landscape in the region over three centuries, through exchanges between the local and the global, as Bengal became the center of the colonial world. Each week in June, we will be curating selections from our collection through our virtual viewing room. Following the first two walk-throughs, which focused on the exchanges between European and Indina painters in the late-18th and 19th centuries, and the influence of the Ajanta expedition led by Christiana Herringham in 1909-11, the third session titled 'Looking East' turns to pan-Asian exchanges in the early-20th century and how it shaped the art of Bengal. 'Looking East' signals a key moment of cultural reorientation for artists in Bengal, revolving largely around the interactions between the Tagore family - in particular between Rabindranath and his nephew, Abanindranath on the one hand, the Japanese cultural ideologue, Okakura Kazuko, who arrived in Bengal around 1902. He was followed by a number of prominent Japanese artists, who brought with them a dynamic range of techniques that reflected a different artistic response to reality and spirituality. Encouraged by E.B. Havell, Principal of the Government Art College, Abanindranath studied these techniques (most importantly, wash) with painters Yokoyama Taikan and Hishida Shunso, before adapting elements of them into his own artistic vision. These exchanges influenced younger painters who centered around Jorasanko and Tagore's Santiniketan, such as Nandalal Bose, Benode Behari Mukherjee and Mukul De, and carried forward many of the possibilities suggested by these exchanges. The current edition of our virtual exhibition focuses on the early interactions that shaped a new vision of spiritual and historical engagement with art for both sets of painters, and paved the way for new experiments with technique - such as wash or print-making - for artists in Bengal.

  • DAG

    Ghare Baire - Looking to the Past

    14 Jun 2020 – 30 Jun 2020

    Explore DAG's Ghare Baire museum-exhibition from home with Heritage Walk Calcutta. The Ghare Baire collection features three centuries of art from Bengal, tracing the evolution of the visual landscape in the region over three centuries, through exchanges between the local and the global, as Bengal became the center of the colonial world. Each week in June, we will be curating selections from our collection through our virtual viewing room. The second edition of this series, ‘Looking to the past’, explores the art that was inspired by the multiple expeditions to the Ajanta caves at the turn of the 19th century, leading to the emergence of a new "Indian" identity and history. ‘Looking to the Past’ takes us back to the start of the Swadeshi movement, where a new generation of artists from Bengal, led notably by Abanindrath Tagore, were rejecting colonial standards of art to rediscover and define a new canon of classical Indian art. They found support in the European Orientalists and Asian philosophers from South Asia and Japan, whose scholarship, networks and financial support led to new efforts to document, collect and popularize a new revivalist aesthetic, based on the visual history of the subcontinent. A part of these efforts, was a series of Ajanta expeditions- first led by John Griffiths of the J.J. School of Art, Bombay and then by Lady Christiana Herringham, where art students spent several winters in the Ajanta Caves, copying and studying the Buddist murals. Some of these young artists went on to become the most recognized names in Indian art - Nandalal Bose, Asit Kumar Haldar, and Pestonji Bomanji among others. The expeditions were a part of a rich discourse on whose past, and which histories would form the foundation of this new “Indian” art. These contestations led to the emergence of an extensive body of art works by the leading artists of the time, that is now widely recognized as the ‘Bengal School of Art’. While it is undeniable that the artworks of the Bengal School all share deep influence of the Ajanta expedition, through the diversity of expressions and approaches that emerged at the time, this exhibition also explores the inherent challenges in trying to create a singular idea of history, tradition and national identity.

    latest works

    • Anonymous (Kalighat pat)

      Untitled (Annapurna)
      17.7 x 11.2 inch (h x w)
      Water colour and colloidal tin on paper
    • Jamini roy

      Untitled
      15 x 26 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      tempera on cardboard
    • Jamini roy

      Untitled, 1920s-50s
      22.2 x 30.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Tempera on board
    • Jamini roy

      Untitled
      10.7 x 12 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      tempera on cardboard
    • Jamini roy

      Untitled (Procession), 1920s-50s
      18 x 31.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Tempera on box board
    • Jamini roy

      Untitled
      12.7 x 19.2 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Tempera on board
    • Benode Behari Mukherjee

      Untitled (Santhal) , 1953
      5 x 7 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Water colour and brush and ink on cardboard
    • Haren Das

      Khatal
      10.7 x 13.7 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      etching on paper
    • Haren Das

      In the Kitchen , 1959
      6.2 x 5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Woodcut on paper
    • Haren Das

      Moody Maid, 1963
      10.2 x 6 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Woodcut on paper
    • Haren Das

      Across the Stream, 1962
      6.2 x 8.7 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Woodcut print on paper
    • Chittaprosad

      Untitled
      8.5 x 14.2 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Lino print on rice paper
    • Chittaprosad

      Untitled
      12 x 14 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Linocut on paper
    • Ramendranath Chakravorty

      Untitled
      13.2 x 17 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Watercolour on paper
    • Nandalal Bose

      Standing Figure Under A Kadam Tree, 1937
      20.5 x 23.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      tempera on paper
    • Nandalal Bose

      Untitled , 1954
      5.5 x 3.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Ink and colour pencil on postcard
    • Nandalal Bose

      Untitled (Flute Player) , 1937
      27 x 23.7 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      tempera on paper
    • Ramkinkar Baij

      Untitled
      11.2 x 7.5 x 1 inch (h x w x d)
      Water colour and ink on paper
    • Prosanto Roy

      Untitled
      9.5 x 7.2 inch (h x w)
      Water colour on paper
    • Radha Charan Bagchi

      Untitled
      59.2 x 29.1 inch (h x w)
      Tempera and gouache on silk cloth
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